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Soil organic phosphorus dynamics following perturbation of litter cycling in a tropical moist forest
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Ancón, Republic of Panama)
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Ancón, Republic of Panama.
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EA, UK.
2010 (English)In: European Journal of Soil Science, ISSN 1351-0754, E-ISSN 1365-2389, Vol. 61, no 1, 48-57 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The productivity of tropical lowland moist forests is often considered to be limited by the availability of phosphorus. Organic phosphorus is often abundant in tropical soils, but its role in forest nutrition is largely unknown. We addressed this by using a large-scale litter manipulation experiment to investigate the stability of soil organic phosphorus in a tropical lowland forest in Central Panama. Three years of litter removal reduced the organic phosphorus concentration in the surface 2 cm of mineral soil by 23%, as determined by NaOH-EDTA extraction and 31P-NMR spectroscopy; this included decreases in phosphate monoesters (20%) and DNA (30%). Three years of litter addition (equivalent to adding 6 kg P ha-1 per year) increased soil organic phosphorus by 16%, which included a 31% increase in DNA. We did not detect higher-order inositol phosphates, despite their abundance in mineral soils of temperate ecosystems. Our observed turnover rate suggests that even the 0-2-cm layer of the mineral soil contributes a fifth of the total phosphorus needed to sustain above-ground growth in this forest. Soil organic phosphorus is thus likely to make a more important contribution to the nutrition of semi-evergreen forest plants than has hitherto been acknowledged.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 61, no 1, 48-57 p.
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-30973DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2389.2009.01200.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-30973DiVA: diva2:289799
Available from: 2010-01-25 Created: 2010-01-25 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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