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All-terrain vehicle use in agriculture: Exposure to whole body vibration and mechanical shock
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
2010 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 41, no 4, 530-535 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whole body vibration (WBV) and mechanical shock were measured in 12 New Zealand farmers during their daily use of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs). As per the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) guidelines for WBV exposure, frequencies between 0 and 100Hz were recorded via a seat-pad tri-axial accelerometer during 20min of ATV use. The farmers were also surveyed to estimate seasonal variation in daily ATV usage as well as 7-day and 12-month prevalence of spinal pain. Frequency-weighted vibration exposure and total riding time were calculated to determine the daily vibration dose value (VDV). The daily VDV of 16.6m/s(1.75) was in excess of the 9.1m/s(1.75) action limit set by ISO guidelines suggesting an increased risk of low back injury from such exposure. However, the mean shock factor R, representing cumulative adverse health effects, was 0.31 indicating that these farmers were not exposed to excessive doses of mechanical shock. Extrapolation of daily VDV data to estimated seasonal variations of farmers in ATV riding time demonstrated that all participants would exceed the ISO recommended maximum permissible limits during the spring lambing season, as compared to lower exposures calculated for summer, autumn and winter. Low back pain was the most commonly reported complaint for both 7 day (50%) and 12 month prevalence (67%), followed by the neck (17% and 42%) and the upper back (17% and 25%) respectively. The results demonstrate high levels of vibration exposure within New Zealand farmers and practical recommendations are needed to reduce their exposure to WBV.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 41, no 4, 530-535 p.
Keyword [en]
Farmers, Vibration dose value, Low back pain, Seasonal variation
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Applied Psychology Medical Ergonomics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-31837DOI: 10.1016/j.apergo.2009.11.002ISI: 000276716500007PubMedID: 19944407OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-31837DiVA: diva2:296991
Available from: 2010-02-18 Created: 2010-02-18 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Rehn, Börje

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