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Pushing back and stretching: Frame adjustments among reproductive rights advocates in Peru
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1975-9060
2011 (English)In: Mobilization, ISSN 1086-671X, E-ISSN 1938-1514, Vol. 16, no 4, 495-512 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper examines how two reproductive rights coalitions in Peru adjust their framing by way of regular interactions with other collective actors. Qualitative data were gathered from the coalitions in the regions of Arequipa and Cusco. The findings demonstrate how the coalitions engage in framing practices not only among their members as they select and refine advocacy goals and strategies, but also by means of interaction, communication, and negotiation with a range of organized social and political actors. Through these interactions, coalition members adjust their own framing of reproductive rights in response to what they perceive from other actors, taking frames from them and directing frames back to them. These interactions occur within broader political and cultural contexts consisting of stable and variable opportunity structures. Thus, the coalitions’ framing practices entail stretching favorable interpretations among allies and neutral actors, while pushing back the boundaries in which the Catholic Church leadership attempts to transmit its own interpretations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MetaPress , 2011. Vol. 16, no 4, 495-512 p.
Keyword [en]
Advocacy, framing, Peru, reproductive rights, social movements
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-33424ISI: 000298520100006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-33424DiVA: diva2:312392
Available from: 2010-04-23 Created: 2010-04-23 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. How social movements influence policies: Advocacy, framing, emotions and outcomes among reproductive rights coalitions in Peru.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How social movements influence policies: Advocacy, framing, emotions and outcomes among reproductive rights coalitions in Peru.
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

With its origins in the early 1990s, feminist advocacy directed at influencing public policies is a relatively new phenomenon in Latin America that is commonly studied at the national level. The aim of this thesis was to study feminist advocacy on reproductive rights at the sub-national level in Peru. Specifically, it explored two research questions: how do feminist movements carry out advocacy to intervene with government agencies and what effects does their advocacy have on policies. This aim ties in with the body of literature that seeks to explain how and what outcomes are produced by social movements. Grounded Theory was used to collect and analyze empirical materials on two reproductive rights coalitions and their members in Arequipa and Cusco, Peru. Empirical materials consisted of focus group discussions, individual interviews and participant observation. Data analysis resulted in two core categories: Coalition-Government Interactions and Policy Outcomes. Linked to the core categories are thirteen categories, which constitute factors that the reproductive rights coalitions “deal with” or “strategize about” in order to interact with government officials and attain policy outcomes. The coalitions maneuver those factors they have immediate control over - tactics, organization, framing and emotions - as a means to deal with those factors they do not have immediate control over - relationships with other policy actors as well as political, cultural and social contexts. The findings help refine existing theories on how and what outcomes are attained by social movements. The coalitions and their members influence policies through various channels by developing an array of interactions with government officials. This allows the coalitions to handle potential constraints on their ability to be a critical voice. Political, cultural and social contexts are not the only external factors affecting the coalitions’ influence on policies. Another key external factor is their relationships with other policy actors comprised of a range of organized political and social groups. Concerning internal factors, the coalitions and their members rely on framing activities and emotion work in addition to organization and tactics. Indeed, the coalitions and their members engage in framing activities and emotion work by means of their relationships with other policy actors to influence policies. Finally, the coalitions perceive effects of their advocacy including, but not limited to, the modification of laws and policies. Instead, outcomes were identified along different stages of the policy process, including the impact of coalition frames on policy positions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Sociologiska institutionen, Umeå universitet, 2010. 91 p.
Series
Akademiska avhandlingar vid Sociologiska institutionen, Umeå universitet, ISSN 1104-2508 ; 62
Keyword
Advocacy, emotions, framing, outcomes, Peru, policies, reproductive rights, social movements
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-33483 (URN)978-91-7264-990-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-05-21, Norra Beteendevetarhuset HS1031, Umeå universitet, Umeå, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-04-30 Created: 2010-04-26 Last updated: 2015-03-27Bibliographically approved

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