umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Smoking and risk for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: analysis of the EPIC cohort
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
Show others and affiliations
2009 (English)In: Annals of Neurology, ISSN 0364-5134, E-ISSN 1531-8249, Vol. 65, no 4, 378-385 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Cigarette smoking has been reported as "probable" risk factor for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a poorly understood disease in terms of aetiology. The extensive longitudinal data of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) were used to evaluate age-specific mortality rates from ALS and the role of cigarette smoking on the risk of dying from ALS.

Methods: A total of 517,890 healthy subjects were included, resulting in 4,591,325 person-years. ALS cases were ascertained through death certificates. Cox hazard models were built to investigate the role of smoking on the risk of ALS, using packs/years and smoking duration to study dose-response.

Results: A total of 118 subjects died from ALS, resulting in a crude mortality rate of 2.69 per 100,000/year. Current smokers at recruitment had an almost two-fold increased risk of dying from ALS compared to never smokers (HR = 1.89, 95% C.I. 1.14-3.14), while former smokers at the time of enrollment had a 50% increased risk (HR = 1.48, 95% C.I. 0.94-2.32). The number of years spent smoking increased the risk of ALS (p for trend = 0.002). Those who smoked more than 33 years had more than a two-fold increased risk of ALS compared with never smokers (HR = 2.16, 95% C.I. 1.33-3.53). Conversely, the number of years since quitting smoking was associated with a decreased risk of ALS compared with continuing smoking.

Interpretation: These results strongly support the hypothesis of a role of cigarette smoking in aetiology of ALS. We hypothesize that this could occur through lipid peroxidation via formaldehyde exposure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: J. Wiley & Sons , 2009. Vol. 65, no 4, 378-385 p.
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-34692DOI: 10.1002/ana.21653PubMedID: 19399866OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-34692DiVA: diva2:323867
Available from: 2010-06-12 Created: 2010-06-11 Last updated: 2015-04-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Andersen, Peter MHallmans, Göran

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersen, Peter MHallmans, Göran
By organisation
NeurologyNutritional Research
In the same journal
Annals of Neurology
Nutrition and DieteticsNeurology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 59 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf