umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Modulation of the endocannabinoid system: neuroprotection or neurotoxicity?
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
2010 (English)In: Experimental Neurology, ISSN 0014-4886, E-ISSN 1090-2430, Vol. 224, no 1, 37-47 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is now a large volume of data indicating that compounds activating cannabinoid CB(1) receptors, either directly or indirectly by preventing the breakdown of endogenous cannabinoids, can protect against neuronal damage produced by a variety of neuronal "insults". Given that such neurodegenerative stimuli result in increased endocannabinoid levels and that animals with genetic deletions of CB(1) receptors are more susceptible to the deleterious effects of such stimuli, a case can be made for an endogenous neuroprotective role of endocannabinoids. However, this is an oversimplification of the current literature, since (a) compounds released together with the endocannabinoids can contribute to the neuroprotective effect; (b) other proteins, such as TASK-1 and PPARalpha, are involved; (c) the CB(1) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant has also been reported to have neuroprotective properties in a number of animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, the CB(2) receptor located on peripheral immune cells and activated microglia are potential targets for novel therapies. In terms of the clinical usefulness of targeting the endocannabinoid system for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, data are emerging, but important factors to be considered are windows of opportunity (for acute situations such as trauma and ischemia) and the functionality of the target receptors (for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier , 2010. Vol. 224, no 1, 37-47 p.
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-35627DOI: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2010.03.021ISI: 000279128400005PubMedID: 20353772OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-35627DiVA: diva2:345716
Available from: 2010-08-26 Created: 2010-08-26 Last updated: 2015-10-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Fowler, Christopher JRojo, Maria LuisaRodriguez-Gaztelumendi, Antonio

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Fowler, Christopher JRojo, Maria LuisaRodriguez-Gaztelumendi, Antonio
By organisation
Pharmacology
In the same journal
Experimental Neurology
Pharmacology and Toxicology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 39 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf