umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Cardiovascular and diabetes mortality determined by nutrition during parents' and grandparents' slow growth period
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7439-002X
2002 (English)In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 10, no 11, 682-688 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Overfeeding and overeating in families are traditions that are often transferred from generation to generation. Irrespective of these family traditions, food availability might lead to overfeeding, in its turn leading to metabolic adaptations. Apart from selection, could these adaptations to the social environment have transgenerational effects? This study will attempt to answer the following question: Can overeating during a child's slow growth period (SGP), before their prepubertal peak in growth velocity influence descendants' risk of death from cardiovascular disease and diabetes? Data were collected by following three cohorts born in 1890, 1905 and 1920 in Överkalix parish in northern Sweden up until death or 1995. The parents' or grandparents' access to food during their SGP was determined by referring to historical data on harvests and food prices, records of local community meetings and general historical facts. If food was not readily available during the father's slow growth period, then cardiovascular disease mortality of the proband was low. Diabetes mortality increased if the paternal grandfather was exposed to a surfeit of food during his slow growth period. (Odds Ratio 4.1, 95% confidence interval 1.33-12.93, P=0.01). Selection bias seemed to be unlikely. A nutrition-linked mechanism through the male line seems to have influenced the risk for cardiovascular and diabetes mellitus mortality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group , 2002. Vol. 10, no 11, 682-688 p.
Keyword [en]
childhood overeating, slow growth period, transgenerational effects, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, mortality
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-36048DOI: 10.1038/sj.ejhg.5200859OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-36048DiVA: diva2:351615
Available from: 2010-09-15 Created: 2010-09-15 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Bygren, Lars OlovEdvinsson, Sören

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bygren, Lars OlovEdvinsson, Sören
By organisation
Department of Community Medicine and RehabilitationCentre for Population Studies (CPS)
In the same journal
European Journal of Human Genetics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 171 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf