Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Metabolic factors and the risk of pancreatic cancer: a prospective analysis of almost 580,000 men and women in the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 19, no 9, 2307-2317 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between factors in metabolic syndrome (MetS; single and combined) and the risk of pancreatic cancer. METHODS: The Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project is a pooled cohort containing data on body mass index, blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides. During follow-up, 862 individuals were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to calculate relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals using the above-mentioned factors categorized into quintiles and transformed into z-scores. All z-scores were summarized and a second z-transformation creating a composite z-score for MetS was done. All risk estimates were calibrated to correct for a regression dilution bias. RESULTS: The trend over quintiles was positively associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer for mid-blood pressure (mid-BP) and glucose in men and for body mass index, mid-BP, and glucose in women. The z-score for the adjusted mid-BP (RR, 1.10; 1.01-1.20) and the calibrated z-score for glucose (RR, 1.37; 1.14-1.34) were positively associated with pancreatic cancer in men. In women, a positive association was found for calibrated z-scores for mid-BP (RR, 1.34; 1.08-1.66), for the calibrated z-score for glucose (RR, 1.98; 1.41-2.76), and for the composite z-score for MetS (RR, 1.58; 1.34-1.87). CONCLUSION: Our study adds further evidence to a possible link between abnormal glucose metabolism and risk of pancreatic cancer. IMPACT: To our knowledge, this is the first study on MetS and pancreatic cancer using prediagnostic measurements of the examined factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research , 2010. Vol. 19, no 9, 2307-2317 p.
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-36113DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-0234ISI: 000281683800021PubMedID: 20826833OAI: diva2:351966
Available from: 2010-09-17 Created: 2010-09-17 Last updated: 2011-11-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Stocks, TanjaJonsson, HåkanHäggström, ChristelHallmans, GöranStattin, Pär
By organisation
Urology and AndrologyOncologyNutritional Research
In the same journal
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention
Cancer and Oncology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 33 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link