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Mediterranean dietary patterns and prospective weight change in participants of the EPIC-PANACEA project
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2010 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 92, no 4, 912-921 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is an association between a greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet and a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases. However, it is not clear whether this dietary pattern may be also protective against the development of obesity.

OBJECTIVE: We assessed the association between the adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern (MDP), prospective weight change, and the incidence of overweight or obesity.

DESIGN: We conducted a prospective cohort study [the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol Consumption, Cessation of Smoking, Eating Out of Home, and Obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project] in 373,803 individuals (103,455 men and 270,348 women; age range: 25-70 y) from 10 European countries. Anthropometric measurements were obtained at recruitment and after a median follow-up time of 5 y. The relative Mediterranean Diet Score (rMED; score range: 0-18) was used to assess adherence to the MDP according to the consumption of 9 dietary components that are characteristic of the Mediterranean diet. The association between the rMED and 5-y weight change was modeled through multiadjusted mixed-effects linear regression. RESULTS: Individuals with a high adherence to the MDP according to the rMED (11-18 points) showed a 5-y weight change of -0.16 kg (95% CI: -0.24, -0.07 kg) and were 10% (95% CI: 4%, 18%) less likely to develop overweight or obesity than were individuals with a low adherence to the MDP (0-6 points). The low meat content of the Mediterranean diet seemed to account for most of its positive effect against weight gain.

CONCLUSION: This study shows that promoting the MDP as a model of healthy eating may help to prevent weight gain and the development of obesity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 92, no 4, 912-921 p.
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Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-36116DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.2010.29482ISI: 000282234100031PubMedID: 20810975OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-36116DiVA: diva2:351970
Available from: 2010-09-17 Created: 2010-09-17 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, IngegerdHellström, Veronica
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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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  • de-DE
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