umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The effect of music intervention in stress response to cardiac surgery in a randomized clinical trial
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Center for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital.
2009 (English)In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 38, no 3, 201-207 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective To evaluate the effect of bed rest with music on the first postoperative day to decrease stress for patients who have undergone heart surgery.

Methods A repeated-measures randomized controlled trial was used. The study took place in a cardiothoracic intermediary unit of a university hospital in Sweden. Fifty-eight patients who had undergone open coronary artery bypass grafting or aortic valve replacement surgery were included. Stress response was assessed by determining the serum cortisol, heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, arterial oxygen tension, arterial oxygen saturation, and subjective pain and anxiety levels. At 12:00 noon on postoperative day 1, patients were allocated to receive 30 minutes of uninterrupted bed rest with music and then 30 minutes of bed rest or alternatively 60 minutes of uninterrupted bed rest. The music was soft and relaxing, included different melodies in new-age style, played with a volume at 50 to 60 dB, and distributed through a music pillow connected to an MP3 player.

Results After 30 minutes of bed rest, there was a significant difference in s-cortisol levels between the groups; 484. 4 mmol/L in the music group versus 618.8 mmol/L in the control group (P < .02). However, this difference in s-cortisol levels was not found 30 minutes later (ie, after a total of 60 minutes). There was no difference in heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, arterial oxygen tension, arterial oxygen saturation, and subjective pain and anxiety levels between the groups.

Conclusion There is sufficient practical evidence of stress reduction to suggest that a proposed regimen of listening to music while resting in bed after open heart surgery be put into clinical use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 38, no 3, 201-207 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-37409DOI: 10.1016/j.hrtlng.2008.07.008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-37409DiVA: diva2:360225
Available from: 2010-11-08 Created: 2010-11-02 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Nilsson, Ulrica

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nilsson, Ulrica
In the same journal
Heart & Lung

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 45 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf