umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Promoting a continuation of self and normality: person-centred care as described by people with dementia, their family members and aged care staff
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
Australian Centre for Evidence-Based Aged Care (ACEBAC), La Trobe University.
Australian Centre for Evidence-Based Aged Care (ACEBAC), La Trobe University.
2010 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 17-18, 2611-2618 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This article aims to describe the content of person-centred care as described by people with dementia, family members and staff in residential aged care.

BACKGROUND: Person-centred care is increasingly being regarded as synonymous with best quality aged care; however, studies exploring stakeholders' experiences of person-centred care are few.

DESIGN: A qualitative explorative design was employed using conversational research interviews and content analysis.

METHOD: Research interviews were conducted in 2007 and 2008 with staff working in aged care (n = 37), people with early onset dementia (n = 11), and family members of patients with dementia (n = 19) and were analysed using content analysis.

RESULTS: The findings indicated that the core category of person-centred care was promoting a continuation of self and normality. Five content categories emerged as contributing to promoting a continuation of self and normality: knowing the person; welcoming family; providing meaningful activities; being in a personalised environment; and experiencing flexibility and continuity.

CONCLUSIONS: This study describes person-centred care as it is understood by people with dementia, their family members and staff in residential aged care, and as such it contributes with inside perspectives to current understandings of person-centred care, perspectives that have been largely lacking. Relevance to clinical practice.  The findings of this study are clinically relevant and ready to be operationalised and applied in clinical aged care. The categories can be used as a topic guide for discussions in aged care organisations on the quality of current care and as elements indicating how to increase the person-centredness of care provided.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 19, no 17-18, 2611-2618 p.
Keyword [en]
Aged care, Alzheimer´s disease, dementia, nurses, nursing, person-centred care
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-37427DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2009.03143.xISI: 000280993800026PubMedID: 20586833OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-37427DiVA: diva2:360346
Available from: 2010-11-03 Created: 2010-11-03 Last updated: 2010-12-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Edvardsson, David

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Edvardsson, David
By organisation
Department of Nursing
In the same journal
Journal of Clinical Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 157 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf