umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Nutrient constraints on metabolism affect the temperature regulation of aquatic bacterial growth efficiency
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
Department of Forest Ecology and Management, SLU, Umeå.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
2010 (English)In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, Vol. 60, no 4, 894-902 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inorganic nutrient availability and temperature are recognized as major regulators of organic carbon processing by aquatic bacteria, but little is known about how these two factors interact to control bacterial metabolic processes. We manipulated the temperature of boreal humic stream water samples within 0–25°C and measured bacterial production (BP) and respiration (BR) with and without inorganic nitrogen + phosphorus addition. Both BP and BR increased exponentially with temperature in all experiments, with Q 10 values varying between 1.2 and 2.4. The bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) showed strong negative relationships with temperature in nutrient-enriched samples and in natural stream water where community-level BP and BR were not limited by nutrients. However, there were no relationships between BGE and temperature in samples where BP and BR were significantly constrained by the inorganic nutrient availability. The results suggest that metabolic responses of aquatic bacterial communities to temperature variations can be strongly dependent on whether the bacterial metabolism is limited by inorganic nutrients or not. Such responses can have consequences for both the carbon flux through aquatic food webs and for the flux of CO2 from aquatic systems to the atmosphere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer , 2010. Vol. 60, no 4, 894-902 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-37456DOI: 10.1007/s00248-010-9751-1ISI: 000284255700019OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-37456DiVA: diva2:360608
Available from: 2010-11-03 Created: 2010-11-03 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Berggren, MartinJonsson, AndersJansson, Mats
By organisation
Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences
In the same journal
Microbial Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 148 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf