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Life course origins of the metabolic syndrome in middle-aged women and men: the role of socioeconomic status and metabolic risk factors in adolescence and early adulthood
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
2011 (English)In: Annals of Epidemiology, ISSN 1047-2797, E-ISSN 1873-2585, Vol. 21, no 2, 103-110 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To assess whether body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and socioeconomic status in adolescence and early adulthood are independently related to the metabolic syndrome in adult women and men.

METHODS: We based our work on a Swedish prospective cohort study that recruited participants at 16 years of age (N = 1083 at age 16; 403 women and 429 men at age 43, 78% of those still alive [N = 1071]). Blood pressure (BP) and BMI were assessed when participants were 16 and 21 years of age. At age 43, the metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation guidelines. Socioeconomic status (SES) was operationalized by the participant (age 21 and 43) or parent's (age 16) occupational status. Information on smoking, snuff, alcohol, and inactivity was collected at age 43.

RESULTS: In women, SES at age 16 was independently related to the risk of metabolic syndrome. In women and men, BMI at age 16 was related to metabolic syndrome but was attenuated by BMI at age 21, which was significant in the final model; in women systolic BP displayed similar patterns.

CONCLUSIONS: Our data seem to suggest two independent life course pathways for metabolic syndrome: one metabolic pathway for both women and men operating through BMI (for women also systolic BP) in adolescence and early adulthood, and for women, an apparently independent pathway through adolescent socioeconomic disadvantage. Ann Epidemiol 2011;21:103-110. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 21, no 2, 103-110 p.
Keyword [en]
Adolescence; Adult; Blood Pressure; Body Mass Index; Cohort Studies; Metabolic Syndrome X; Prospective Studies; Socioeconomic Status
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-39480DOI: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2010.08.012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-39480DiVA: diva2:392896
Available from: 2011-01-28 Created: 2011-01-28 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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