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Red meat and a fortified manufactured toddler milk drink increase dietary zinc intakes without affecting zinc status of New Zealand toddlers
Department of Human Nutrition University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand .
Department of Human Nutrition University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand .
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Department of Human Nutrition University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand .
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2010 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 140, no 12, 2221-2226 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Evidence suggests that New Zealand (NZ) children are mildly zinc deficient and may respond to dietary change. A 20-wk randomized intervention trial was therefore conducted to determine whether an increased intake of red meat or consumption of a fortified manufactured toddler milk drink (FTMD, fortified with zinc and other micronutrients) would increase dietary zinc intakes and improve the biochemical zinc status of 12- to 20-mo-old NZ toddlers. Toddlers were randomized to a red meat intervention (n = 90), FTMD intervention (n = 45), or nonfortified milk placebo (n = 90). Study foods were provided. Adherence was assessed via monthly 7-d meat or milk recording diaries. Hair and serum zinc concentrations, and length and weight were measured at baseline and postintervention. Nutrient intakes were assessed via 3-d weighed food records at baseline, wk 4, and wk 18. At baseline, 38% of participants had low serum zinc concentrations despite seemingly adequate dietary zinc intakes (<4% below the Estimated Average Requirement). Dietary zinc intakes significantly increased by 0.8 mg/d (95% CI: 0.5, 1.1) in the meat group and 0.7 mg/d (95% CI: 0.2, 1.1) in the FTMD group compared with a decrease of -0.5 (95% CI: -0.8, -0.2) mg/d in the placebo group. No corresponding increases in serum or hair zinc concentrations were observed. Dietary zinc intakes achievable via interventions based on red meat or a FTMD are unlikely to improve biochemical zinc status in NZ toddlers. These results also question cutoffs used to define zinc deficiency in toddlers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 140, no 12, 2221-2226 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-40248DOI: 10.3945/jn.109.120717ISI: 000285123300019PubMedID: 20980643OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-40248DiVA: diva2:398728
Available from: 2011-02-18 Created: 2011-02-18 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A

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