Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Effects of badminton and ice hockey on bone mass in young males: a 12-year follow-up.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
2010 (English)In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 47, no 3, 666-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of different types of weight bearing physical activity on bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and evaluate any residual benefits after the active sports career. Beginning at 17 years of age, BMD was measured 5 times, during 12 years, in 19 badminton players, 48 ice hockey players, and 25 controls. During the active career, badminton players gained significantly more BMD compared to ice hockey players at all sites: in their femoral neck (mean difference (Delta) 0.06 g/cm(2), p=0.04), humerus (Delta 0.06 g/cm(2), p=0.01), lumbar spine (Delta 0.08 g/cm(2), p=0.01), and their legs (Delta 0.05 g/cm(2), p=0.003), after adjusting for age at baseline, changes in weight, height, and active years. BMD gains in badminton players were higher also compared to in controls at all sites (Delta 0.06-0.17 g/cm(2), p<0.01 for all). Eleven badminton players and 37 ice hockey players stopped their active career a mean of 6 years before the final follow-up. Both these groups lost significantly more BMD at the femoral neck and lumbar spine compared to the control group (Delta 0.05-0.12 g/cm(2), p<0.05 for all). At the final follow-up, badminton players had significantly higher BMD of the femoral neck, humerus, lumbar spine, and legs (Delta 0.08-0.20 g/cm(2), p<0.01 for all) than both ice hockey players and controls. In summary, the present study may suggest that badminton is a more osteogenic sport compared to ice hockey. The BMD benefits from previous training were partially sustained with reduced activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 47, no 3, 666-72 p.
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-41694DOI: 10.1016/j.bone.2010.06.022ISI: 000281464200027PubMedID: 20601297OAI: diva2:407603
Available from: 2011-03-31 Created: 2011-03-31 Last updated: 2014-11-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Tervo, TaruNordström, PeterNordström, Anna
By organisation
Sports MedicineGeriatric Medicine
In the same journal
Sport and Fitness Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 51 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link