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Effect of cold hardening on the components of respiratory decarboxylation in the light and in the dark in leaves of winter rye
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5151-5184
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
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1996 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 111, no 3, 713-719 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the dark, all decarboxylation reactions are associated with the oxidase reactions of mitochondrial electron transport. In the light, photorespiration is also active in photosynthetic cells. In winter rye (Secale cereale L.), cold hardening resulted in a P-fold increase in the rate of dark respiratory CO2 release from leaves compared with nonhardened (NH) controls. However, in the light, NH and cold-hardened (CH) leaves had comparable rates of oxidase decarboxylation and total intracellular decarboxylation, Furthermore, whereas CH leaves showed similar rates of total oxidase decarboxylation in the dark and light, NH leaves showed a 2-fold increase in total oxidase activity in the light compared with the dark. Light suppressed oxidase decarboxylation of end products of photosynthesis 2-fold in NH leaves and 3-fold in CH leaves in air. However, in high-CO2, light did not suppress the oxidase decarboxylation of end products. Thus, the decrease in oxidase decarboxylation of end products observed in the light and in air reflected glycolate-cycle-related inhibition of tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. We also showed that the glycolate cycle was involved in the decarboxylation of the end products of photosynthesis in both NH and CH leaves, suggesting a flow of fixed carbon out of the starch pool in the light.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1996. Vol. 111, no 3, 713-719 p.
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-44673ISI: A1996UX88100007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-44673DiVA: diva2:433645
Available from: 2011-08-10 Created: 2011-06-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Hurry, VaughanÖquist, GunnarGardeström, Per

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