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Bile salt-stimulated lipase and pancreatic lipase-related protein 2: key enzymes for lipid digestion in the newborn examined using the Caco-2 cell line
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological chemistry.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
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2011 (English)In: Journal of Lipid Research, ISSN 0022-2275, E-ISSN 1539-7262, Vol. 52, no 11, 1949-1956 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In rodents, bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) and pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (PLRP2) are the dominant lipases expressed in the exocrine pancreas in early life, when milk is the main food. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if BSSL and PLRP2 are also key enzymes in neonatal intestinal fat digestion. Using Caco-2 cells as a model for the small intestinal epithelium, purified human enzymes were incubated in the apical chamber with substrates and bile salt concentrations resembling the milieu of the small intestine of newborn infants. BSSL and PLRP2 hydrolyzed triglycerides (TG) to free fatty acids (FA) and glycerol. The cells took up the FA, which were reesterfied to TG. Together, BSSL and PLRP2 have a synergistic effect, increasing cellular uptake 4-fold compared to the sum of each lipase alone. A synergistic effect was also observed with retinyl ester as a substrate. PLRP2 hydrolyzed cholesteryl ester but not as efficiently as BSSL, and the two had an additive rather than synergistic effect. We conclude the key enzymes in intestinal fat digestion are different in newborns than later in life. Further studies are needed to fully understand this difference and its implication for designing optimal neonatal nutrition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2011. Vol. 52, no 11, 1949-1956 p.
Keyword [en]
Bile acids and salts, Digestion, Fatty acid, Lipase, Nutrition, Triglycerides, Caco-2 cells, Fat, Newborn
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-46582DOI: 10.1194/jlr.M015685PubMedID: 21865348OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-46582DiVA: diva2:439155
Available from: 2011-09-06 Created: 2011-09-06 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, Eva-LottaHernell, OlleBläckberg, LarsFält, HelenLindquist, Susanne
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