umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Differences according to socioeconomic status in the management and mortality in men with high risk prostate cancer
Show others and affiliations
2012 (English)In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 48, no 1, 75-84 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Outcomes for many cancer forms are associated with socioeconomic status (SES).We investigated if SES was associated with management and mortality in men with high risk prostate cancer.

Material and methods: A nation-wide population-based cohort in Prostate Cancer Data Base Sweden (PCBaSe), a merged database including data on incident prostate cancer identified in the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) between 1997 and 2006. High risk PCa was defined as T3 tumour, and/or Gleason score 8–10 and/or PSA 20–50 ng/mL. Use of bone scan, curative treatment, and mortality in relation to SES was assessed by logistic, Cox, and competing risk regression with hazard ratios (HR), sub-distributed HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for co-morbidity, age, calendar period and clinical subgroups.

Results: Amongst 17,522 high risk prostate cancer patients, a bone scan was more often performed in higher white-collar than in blue-collar workers (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.21–1.40). Amongst men without metastases, the likelihood of intention to treat was higher in higher white-collar workers (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.28–1.57). In men who received curative treatment, the likelihood was higher to undergo radical prostatectomy for higher white-collar patients (OR 1.29; 95% CI 1.10–1.47). In men without metastases, not only overall mortality was lower amongst higher white-collar workers (HR, 0.76; 95% CI 0.60–0.97), but also prostate cancer-specific mortality (sHR 0.70; 95% CI, 0.49–0.99).

Conclusions: We conclude that socioeconomic disparities in the management and mortality in men with high risk prostate cancer exist also within the setting of a National Health Care System aiming to provide care on equal terms to all residents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 48, no 1, 75-84 p.
Keyword [en]
diagnostic intensity, high risk prostatic neoplasm, mortality, socioeconomic status, treatment, Sweden
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-48494DOI: 10.1016/j.ejca.2011.07.009PubMedID: 21852113OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-48494DiVA: diva2:450319
Available from: 2011-10-20 Created: 2011-10-20 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Robinson, DavidStattin, Pär
By organisation
Urology and Andrology
In the same journal
European Journal of Cancer
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 71 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf