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REDUCED SENSITIVITY TO PHOTOINHIBITION FOLLOWING FROST-HARDENING OF WINTER RYE IS DUE TO INCREASED PHOSPHATE AVAILABILITY
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5151-5184
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5900-7395
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
1993 (English)In: Planta, ISSN 0032-0935, E-ISSN 1432-2048, Vol. 190, no 4, 484-490 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The possibility of a role for phosphate metabolism in the photosynthetic regulation that occurs during frost hardening was investigated in winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv. Musketeer). Leaves of frost-hardened and non-hardened winter rye were studied during photosynthetic induction, and at steady state after being allowed to take up 20 mM orthophosphate through the transpiration stream for 3 h. At the growth irradiance (350 mumol.m-2.s-1) frost-hardening increased the stationary rate Of CO2-dependent O2 evolution by 57% and 25% when measured at 5 and 20-degrees-C, respectively. Frost-hardening also reduced the lag phase to stationary photosynthesis by 40% at 5-degrees-C and decreased the susceptibility of leaves to oscillations during induction and after interruption of the actinic beam during steady-state photosynthesis. These responses are all indicative of increased phosphate availability in frost-hardened leaves. As reported previously by Oquist and Huner (1993, Planta 189, 150-156), frost-hardening also decreased the reduction state of Q(A), the primary, stable quinone acceptor of PSII, and decreased the sensitivity of winter rye to photoinhibition of photosynthesis. Non-hardened rye leaves fed orthophosphate also showed an increased photosynthetic capacity (25% at 20-degrees-C and light saturation), lower reduction state of Q(A), a reduced sensitivity to photoinhibition and lower susceptibility to oscillations resulting from a brief interruption of the actinic light. Thus, the data indicate that phosphate metabolism plays a key role in photosynthetic acclimation of winter rye to low temperatures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1993. Vol. 190, no 4, 484-490 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-46870ISI: A1993LK46300008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-46870DiVA: diva2:455547
Available from: 2011-11-10 Created: 2011-09-16 Last updated: 2017-12-08

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