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The effect of physical activity on bone accrual, osteoporosis and fracture prevention
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
2011 (English)In: Open Bone Journal, ISSN 1876-5254, no 3, 11-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Physical activity has been recommended for the prevention and even treatment of osteoporosis because it potentially can increase bone mass and strength during childhood and adolescence and reduce the risk of falling in older populations. However, few reports have systematically investigated the effect of physical activity on bone in men and women of different ages.

Purpose: The goal of this study was to review the literature relating to the effect of physical activity on bone mineral density in men and women of various ages.

Method: This review systematically evaluates the evidence for the effect of physical activity on bone mineral density. Cochrane and Medline databases were searched for relevant articles, and the selected articles were evaluated.

Results: The review found evidence to support the effectiveness of weight bearing physical activity on bone accrual during childhood and adolescence. The effect of weight bearing physical activity was site-specific. In contrast, the role of physical activity in adulthood is primarily geared toward maintaining bone mineral density. The evidence for a protective effect of physical activity on bone is not as solid as that for younger individuals.

Conclusions: The effect of weight bearing physical activity is seen in sites that are exposed to loading. There also seems to be a continuous adaptive response in bone to loading. Additional randomized, controlled studies are needed to evaluate the effect of physical activity in the elderly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. no 3, 11-21 p.
National Category
Orthopedics Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-50892DOI: 10.2174/1876525401103010011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-50892DiVA: diva2:470659
Available from: 2011-12-29 Created: 2011-12-29 Last updated: 2014-11-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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