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Outcome predictors in guided and unguided self-help for social anxiety disorder
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway and Anxiety Disorders research Network, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway and Anxiety Disorders research Network, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway and Anxiety Disorders research Network, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway och Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
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2012 (English)In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 50, no 1, 12-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Internet-based self-help with therapist guidance has shown promise as an effective treatment and may increase access to evidence-based psychological treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Although unguided self-help has been suggested primarily as a population-based preventive intervention, some studies indicate that patients with SAD may profit from unguided self-help. Gaining knowledge about predictors of outcome in guided and unguided self-help for SAD is important to ensure that these interventions can be offered to those who are most likely to respond. Utilizing a sample of 245 patients who received either guided or unguided self-help for SAD, the present study examined pre-treatment symptoms and program factors as predictors of treatment adherence and outcome. The results were in line with previous findings from the face-to-face treatment literature: namely, the intensity of baseline SAD symptoms, but not depressive symptoms, predicted treatment outcomes in both unguided and guided self-help groups. Outcomes were unrelated to whether a participant has generalized versus specific SAD. Furthermore, for the unguided self-help group, higher credibility ratings of the treatment program were associated with increased treatment adherence. The findings suggest that guided and unguided self-help may increase access to SAD treatment in a population that is more heterogeneous than previously assumed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012. Vol. 50, no 1, 12-21 p.
Keyword [en]
Social anxiety disorder, Predictors, Guided self-help, Unguided self-help, Cognitive behavior therapy
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-51025DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2011.10.009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-51025DiVA: diva2:474232
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Carlbring, Per

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