umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Lifestyle factors and lumbar disc disease: results of a German multi-center case-control study (EPILIFT).
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Berlin, Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9722-0370
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 12, no 5, R193- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: In the large-scale case-control study EPILIFT, we investigated the dose-response relationship between lifestyle factors (weight, smoking amount, cumulative duration of different sports activities) and lumbar disc disease.

METHODS: In four German study regions (Frankfurt am Main, Freiburg, Halle/Saale, Regensburg), 564 male and female patients with lumbar disc herniation and 351 patients with lumbar disc narrowing (chondrosis) aged 25 to 70 years were prospectively recruited. From the regional population registers, 901 population control subjects were randomly selected. In a structured personal interview, we enquired as to body weight at different ages, body height, cumulative smoking amount and cumulative duration of different sports activities. Confounders were selected according to biological plausibility and to the change-in-estimate criterion. Adjusted, gender-stratified odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using unconditional logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS: The results of this case-control study reveal a positive association between weight and lumbar disc herniation as well as lumbar disc narrowing among men and women. A medium amount of pack-years was associated with lumbar disc herniation and narrowing in men and women. A non-significantly lowered risk of lumbar disc disease was found in men with high levels of cumulative body building and strength training.

CONCLUSIONS: According to our multi-center case-control study, body weight might be related to lumbar disc herniation as well as to lumbar disc narrowing. Further research should clarify the potential protective role of body building or strength training on lumbar disc disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 12, no 5, R193- p.
National Category
Family Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-52341DOI: 10.1186/ar3164ISI: 000284625900043PubMedID: 20955546OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-52341DiVA: diva2:504219
Available from: 2012-02-20 Created: 2012-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(378 kB)325 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 378 kBChecksum SHA-512
20928b706ae89b2eaa5453c85c68ac3cd785a7dba9c1a85449e4e51a9ff47c8cd785a039ee6b171fdf895ee23a4df67278df13f6b435af20a317c60f20af05f5
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Schumann, Barbara
By organisation
Epidemiology and Global Health
In the same journal
Arthritis Research & Therapy
Family Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 325 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 105 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf