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Combined effect of low-penetrant SNPs on breast cancer risk
Lund University, Department of Laboratory Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8540-6891
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2012 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 106, no 2, 389-396 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Although many low-penetrant genetic risk factors for breast cancer have been discovered, knowledge about the effect of multiple risk alleles is limited, especially in women <50 years. We therefore investigated the association between multiple risk alleles and breast cancer risk as well as individual effects according to age-approximated pre- and post-menopausal status.

METHODS: Ten previously described breast cancer-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analysed in a joint European biobank-based study comprising 3584 breast cancer cases and 5063 cancer-free controls. Genotyping was performed using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and odds ratios were estimated using logistic regression.

RESULTS: Significant associations with breast cancer were confirmed for 7 of the 10 SNPs. Analysis of the joint effect of the original 10 as well as the statistically significant 7 SNPs (rs2981582, rs3803662, rs889312, rs13387042, rs13281615, rs3817198 and rs981782) found a highly significant trend for increasing breast cancer risk with increasing number of risk alleles (P-trend 5.6 x 10(-20) and 1.5 x 10(-25), respectively). Odds ratio for breast cancer of 1.84 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.59-2.14; 10 SNPs) and 2.12 (95% CI: 1.80-2.50; 7 SNPs) was seen for the maximum vs the minimum number of risk alleles. Additionally, one of the examined SNPs (rs981782 in HCN1) had a protective effect that was significantly stronger in premenopausal women (P-value: 7.9 x 10(-4)).

CONCLUSION: The strongly increasing risk seen when combining many low-penetrant risk alleles supports the polygenic inheritance model of breast cancer. British Journal of Cancer (2012) 106, 389-396. doi:10.1038/bjc.2011.461 www.bjcancer.com Published online 1 November 2011 (C) 2012 Cancer Research UK

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Nature Publishing Group, 2012. Vol. 106, no 2, 389-396 p.
Keyword [en]
breast cancer, hereditability, common variants, multiple risk-allele GWA replication
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-52655DOI: 10.1038/bjc.2011.461ISI: 000299321100022OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-52655DiVA: diva2:506899
Available from: 2012-03-01 Created: 2012-02-28 Last updated: 2017-12-07

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