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Hypothesis: Impregnated school uniforms reduce the incidence of dengue infections in school children
National University of Singapore, Department of Medicine, Singapore.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0362-5375
2011 (English)In: Medical Hypotheses, ISSN 0306-9877, E-ISSN 1532-2777, Vol. 76, no 6, 861-862 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dengue infection causes a significant economic, social and medical burden in affected populations in over 100 countries in the tropics and sub-tropics. Current dengue control efforts have generally focused on vector control but have not shown major impact. School-aged children are especially vulnerable to infection, due to sustained human-vector-human transmission in the close proximity environments of schools. Infection in children has a higher rate of complications, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndromes, than infections in adults. There is an urgent need for integrated and complementary population-based strategies to protect vulnerable children. We hypothesize that insecticide-treated school uniforms will reduce the incidence of dengue in school-aged children. The hypothesis would need to be tested in a community based randomized trial. If proven to be true, insecticide-treated school uniforms would be a cost-effective and scalable community based strategy to reduce the burden of dengue in children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011. Vol. 76, no 6, 861-862 p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-53192DOI: 10.1016/j.mehy.2011.02.037PubMedID: 21398046OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-53192DiVA: diva2:510182
Available from: 2012-03-15 Created: 2012-03-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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