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Role of beliefs and emotions in numerical problem solving in university physics education
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
2012 (English)In: Physical Review Special Topics : Physics Education Research, ISSN 1554-9178, E-ISSN 1554-9178, Vol. 8, no 1, 010108- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Numerical problem solving in classical mechanics in university physics education offers a learning situation where students have many possibilities of control and creativity. In this study, expertlike beliefs about physics and learning physics together with prior knowledge were the most important predictors of the quality of performance of a task with many degrees of freedom. Feelings corresponding to control and concentration, i.e., emotions that are expected to trigger students’ intrinsic motivation, were also important in predicting performance. Unexpectedly, intrinsic motivation, as indicated by enjoyment and interest, together with students’ personal interest and utility value beliefs did not predict performance. This indicates that although a certain degree of enjoyment is probably necessary, motivated behavior is rather regulated by integration and identification of expertlike beliefs about learning and are more strongly associated with concentration and control during learning and, ultimately, with high performance. The results suggest that the development of students’ epistemological beliefs is important for students’ ability to learn from realistic problem-solving situations with many degrees of freedom in physics education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Physical Society , 2012. Vol. 8, no 1, 010108- p.
Keyword [en]
physics education, problem solving, computational physics, beliefs, emotions, motivation
National Category
Didactics Physical Sciences
Research subject
didactics of physics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-53232DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.8.010108OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-53232DiVA: diva2:510852
Available from: 2012-03-19 Created: 2012-03-19 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Computational problem solving in university physics education: Students’ beliefs, knowledge, and motivation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computational problem solving in university physics education: Students’ beliefs, knowledge, and motivation
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Solving physics problem in university physics education with a computational approach requires knowledge and skills in several domains, for example, physics, mathematics, programming, and modelling. These competences are in turn related to students' beliefs about these domains as well as about learning, and their motivation to learn. The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the role of university physics students' knowledge, beliefs and motivation when solving and visualizing a physics problem using a computational approach. The results showed that expert-like beliefs about physics and learning physics together with prior knowledge were important predictors of the quality of performance. Feelings corresponding to control and concentration, i.e., emotions that are expected to be good indicators of students' motivation were also good predictors of performance. However, intrinsic motivation, as indicated by enjoyment and interest, together with beliefs expressing students' personal interest and utility value, did not predict performance to any higher extent. Instead, my results indicate that integration and identification of expert-like beliefs about learning and concentration and control emotions during learning are more influential on the quality of performance. Thus, the results suggest that the development of students' epistemological beliefs is important for students' ability to learn from realistic problem-solving situations with many degrees of freedom in physics education. In order to investigate knowledge and beliefs structures network modeling has been applied as a novel tool for analysis. Students' epistemic frames are analyzed before and after the task in computational physics using a network analysis approach on interview transcripts, producing visual representations of mental models. The results show that students change their epistemic framing from a modelling task, with expectancies about learning programming, to a physics task, in which they are challenged to use physics principles and conservation laws in order to troubleshoot and understand their simulations. This implies that the task, even though it is not introducing any new physics, helped the students to develop a more consistent view of the importance of using physics principles in problem solving. When comparing students' framing with teachers,' it is shown that although teachers and students agree on the main features of simulation competence in physics, differences in their epistemic networks can be distinguished. For example, while teachers believe that numerical problem solving facilitates fundamental understanding of physics and mathematics, this is not obvious to students. This implies that university teachers need to be aware of these differences as well as students' beliefs in order to challenge students' expectations and to give support concerning the learning objectives of the assignment. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2012. 60 p.
Series
Studies in Science and Technology Education, ISSN 1652-5051 ; 54
Keyword
physics education, computational physics, simulation, beliefs, motivation, mental models, network analysis
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
didactics of physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-53317 (URN)978-91-7459-398-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-04-16, KBC-huset, KB3A9, Umeå universitet, Umeå, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-03-26 Created: 2012-03-20 Last updated: 2012-03-22Bibliographically approved

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