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A refined view on the "Green lie'': Forest structure and composition succeeding early twentieth century selective logging in SE Norway
Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Ecol & Nat Resource Management, As, Norway.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. (Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Ecol & Nat Resource Management, As, Norway)
Norwegian Forest & Landscape Inst, As, Norway.
Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Ecol & Nat Resource Management, As, Norway.
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 27, no 3, 270-284 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Logging exceeded growth and timber trees were sparse in Norwegian forests in the early 1900s. Still, the forest canopy was lush green and characterised by large tree-crowns. This situation was referred to as the "Green lie'' and was advocated by foresters throughout Scandinavia as an argument in favour of forestry practices based on clear-felling. Here we examine effects of past selective loggings on forest structure and composition in a spruce forest landscape using dendroecology and historical records. Our results show that forests that were selectively logged up to the early 1900s could be structurally heterogeneous with multi-layered canopies, varying degree of openness and continuous presence of old trees across different spatial scales. Because the past forests were not clear-felled, a diverse forest structure in terms of tree species composition and age and diameter distribution was maintained over time, which could enable forest-dwelling species to persist during the early phase following the loggings in the past. This is in sharp contrast to the situation in most modern managed forest landscapes in Scandinavia. A better understanding of the link between loggings in the past- and present-day forest structure and diversity will contribute to rewarding discussions on forestry methods for the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 27, no 3, 270-284 p.
Keyword [en]
Biodiversity, dendroecology, forest history, historical records, selective logging
National Category
Ecology Forest Science Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-54349DOI: 10.1080/02827581.2011.628950ISI: 000302151900003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-54349DiVA: diva2:522771
Available from: 2012-04-24 Created: 2012-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Josefsson, Torbjorn

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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  • de-DE
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