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Memory aging and brain maintenance
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. (Aging and Living Conditions, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden)
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. (Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden and Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany)
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany.
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2012 (English)In: Trends in cognitive sciences, ISSN 1364-6613, E-ISSN 1879-307X, Vol. 16, no 5, 292-305 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Episodic memory and working memory decline with advancing age. Nevertheless, large-scale population-based studies document well-preserved memory functioning in some older individuals. The influential 'reserve' notion holds that individual differences in brain characteristics or in the manner people process tasks allow some individuals to cope better than others with brain pathology and hence show preserved memory performance. Here, we discuss a complementary concept, that of brain maintenance (or relative lack of brain pathology), and argue that it constitutes the primary determinant of successful memory aging. We discuss evidence for brain maintenance at different levels: cellular, neurochemical, gray- and white-matter integrity, and systems-level activation patterns. Various genetic and lifestyle factors support brain maintenance in aging and interventions may be designed to promote maintenance of brain structure and function in late life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 16, no 5, 292-305 p.
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Psychiatry Medical Image Processing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55761DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2012.04.005ISI: 000304026200010PubMedID: 22542563OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-55761DiVA: diva2:529472
Available from: 2012-05-30 Created: 2012-05-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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