umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Differentiation in developmental rate across geographic regions: a photoperiod driven latitude compensating mechanism?
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
2012 (English)In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 121, no 7, 1073-1082 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genetic differentiation and phenotypic plasticity in growth rates along latitudinal gradients may benefit our understanding of latitudinal compensating mechanisms in life history patterns. Here we explore latitudinal compensatory growth mechanisms with respect to photoperiod in northern and southern populations of two damselfly species, Coenagrion puella and C. pulchellum. In addition we compared size of field-collected adults from southern and northern populations. Eggs from females in copulating tandems were collected at two or three localities for each species in each geographic region. Eggs were transported to the laboratory and the experiment started when the eggs hatched. The role of photoperiod on the expression of larval growth rate was evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions. Both species had lower growth rate when reared in the northern photoperiod, which is counter to expectations if species use photoperiodic cues to trigger compensatory growth. Instead, both species displayed countergradient variation in growth rates, which probably enable northern populations to compensate for the shorter growth season in the north. The smaller size of field-collected adults from northern populations also supports the view that these species compensate for the shorter growth season by investing in growth and development but accomplish this at the expense of decreased final size.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 121, no 7, 1073-1082 p.
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-57434DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0706.2011.20015.xISI: 000305614300009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-57434DiVA: diva2:541751
Available from: 2012-07-23 Created: 2012-07-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Johansson, FrankNilsson-Örtman, Viktor
By organisation
Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences
In the same journal
Oikos
Genetics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 63 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf