umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Self-reported impact on daily life activities related to temporomandibular disorders, headaches, and neck-shoulder pain among women in a Sami population living in Northern Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology. (Arcum)
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology. (Arcum)
2012 (English)In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 26, no 3, 215-224 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To analyze the influence of frequency, intensity, and duration of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), headaches, and neck-shoulder pain (NSP) on Sami women's daily life. A further aim was to analyze the relationship between these symptoms and age.

Methods: All 751 Sami women 21 to 70 years old registered in either the Swedish Sami Parliament's electoral register or registered as reindeer owners or herders and living north of the Arctic Circle in Sweden were sent a questionnaire regarding TMD symptoms, NSP, and headaches. In total, 487 women (65%) participated. The questionnaire focused on symptom frequency, duration, and intensity and whether these symptoms influenced activities of daily life. The symptom's interference with daily life activities was measured, respectively, with a numerical rating scale (NRS). The statistical analyses included multiple logistic regression analysis and Chi-square test. A P value < .05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: Seventeen percent of the women reported that symptoms in the jaw-face region to some degree disturbed their daily life, and for 6%, the interference was significant (>= 5 on NRS). Duration of jaw pain, troublesome impaired jaw opening, and neck pain, together with a low education level, affected reports of whether symptoms of TMD influenced daily life. Almost half of the study population reported that headaches had a negative impact on their life. A similar pattern was reported for NSP. The prevalence of frequent and troublesome symptoms of TMD and headaches, but not NSP, showed a declining trend with age.

Conclusion: TMD symptoms, headaches, and NSP negatively influence many Sami women's daily life. Factors related to pain had the greatest influence when these Sami women rated the related impairment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hanover Park, IL: Quintessence Publishing , 2012. Vol. 26, no 3, 215-224 p.
Keyword [en]
headache, oral health, pain, quality of life, temporomandibular disorders
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-58163ISI: 000306938800008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-58163DiVA: diva2:547678
Available from: 2012-08-28 Created: 2012-08-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Temporomandibular disorders among Sami women: perspectives based on an epidemiological survey with mixed methods
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temporomandibular disorders among Sami women: perspectives based on an epidemiological survey with mixed methods
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction The aim of the research project was to examine prevalence, co-morbidity, and impact on daily life of pain and dysfunction in the jaw-face, head, and neck-shoulder regions among adult Sami women in northern Sweden. The aim of the qualitative part of the study was to explore, thoughts, experiences, and beliefs regarding temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among Sami women with and without TMD, to gain insights into their health care experiences.

Methods The research project used a mixed methods approach including questionnaire analysis, a case-control study, and thematic interviews. The study population (Papers I and III) included 487 women living in the Arctic region of northern Sweden and enrolled in the register of the Swedish Sami Parliament or registered as reindeer owners or reindeer herders in the Swedish Board of Agriculture. Two years after the questionnaire study, 22 women (cases) with longstanding, intense, and frequent symptoms indicative of TMD, together with 46 age-matched women (controls) without any symptoms in the jaw–face region, underwent a clinical examination of the function of the temporomandibular joint, jaw- and neck muscles, mandibular mobility, and dental occlusion. The examiner was blind to the women’s affiliation (Paper II). Thematic interviews with a strategic subsample of 17 Sami women (Paper IV) were thereafter conducted and analyzed with a grounded theory approach.

Results The prevalence of frequent symptoms indicative of TMD was 17%, of headaches 19%, and of neck-shoulder pain (NSP) 30%. Seventeen percent reported that their TMD affected daily life. Duration of jaw pain, troublesome impaired jaw opening, and neck pain, together with a low education level, affected the statement of whether TMD influenced daily life or not. Factors related to pain had the greatest influence when these Sami women rated the related impairment. There was a statistically significant relationship between TMD, frequent headaches, and frequent NSP (P <0.0001). Longstanding, intense, and frequent symptoms indicative of TMD remained essentially unchanged over the two-year follow-up period. Cases reported impaired general health and awareness of clenching teeth significantly more frequently than did controls. Variations in dental occlusion did not distinguish cases from controls. In the qualitative part of the project the core category, “Grin(d) and bear it,” summarizes the participants’ various ways and stages of processing and handling the interacting categories: (1) triggers, (2) strains, (3) distrust, and (4) reconciliation with pain and/or difficulties in life. Perpetuating factors were described as mental-physical strain and stress, and also a tooth clenching behavior. Women without TMD expressed factors that helped them to handle strains, reconcile, and stay healthy. They relied on helpful social support.

Conclusion Disabling TMD, headaches, and NSP are common in Sami women. Women with TMD commonly expressed that tooth clenching was a familiar habit related to strains in life; they described an impaired general state of health and distrust in the care providers’ competence and ability to manage their problems. Women without TMD expressed confidence in their self-efficacy and were generally less concerned with strains in their lives. Rehabilitation strategies aiming at empowerment and improved self-efficacy may be a successful approach in women with disabling TMD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2014. 83 p.
Series
Umeå University odontological dissertations, ISSN 0345-7532 ; 133
Keyword
epidemiology, gender, headache, indigenous, pain, qualitative, quality of life, temporomandibular
National Category
Dentistry
Research subject
Odontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92696 (URN)978-91-7601-121-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-10-03, Sal B, byggnad 1D, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-09-12 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2016-08-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Authority records BETA

Storm Mienna, ChristinaWänman, Anders

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Storm Mienna, ChristinaWänman, Anders
By organisation
Clinical Oral Physiology
In the same journal
Journal of Orofacial Pain
Dentistry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 261 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf