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People can detect poor air quality well below guideline concentrations: a prevalence study of annoyance reactions and air pollution from traffic
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
1997 (English)In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 54, no 1, 44-48 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Motor vehicle exhaust fumes are the main source of atmospheric pollution in cities in industrialised countries. They cause respiratory disease and annoy people exposed to them. The relation between ambient exposure to air pollution mainly from motor vehicles and annoyance reactions in a general population was assessed. Also, the importance of factors such as age, sex, respiratory disease, access to the use of a car, and smoking habits on the reporting of these reactions was studied.

METHODS: A postal questionnaire was sent out in 55 urban areas in Sweden that had nearly identical air quality monitoring stations of the urban air monitoring network. From each area, 150 people aged 16-70 were randomly selected. The questionnaire contained questions on perception of air quality as well as a question on how often exhaust fumes were annoying.

RESULTS: Six-monthly nitrogen dioxide concentrations correlated consistently with the prevalence of reported annoyance related to air pollution and traffic exhaust fumes. Black smoke and sulphur dioxide had no significant effects. The frequency of reporting annoyance reactions was higher among people with asthma, women, and people with lack of access to a car.

CONCLUSIONS: In this study town dwellers could detect poor air quality at concentrations well below current guidelines for outdoor air pollution. This suggests that questionnaire studies have a place in monitoring air quality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1997. Vol. 54, no 1, 44-48 p.
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-61317DOI: 10.1136/oem.54.1.44PubMedID: 9072033OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-61317DiVA: diva2:566710
Available from: 2012-11-09 Created: 2012-11-09 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Urban air quality and indicators of respiratory problems
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban air quality and indicators of respiratory problems
1997 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 1997. 77 p.
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 552
Keyword
air pollution, respiratory symptoms, asthma, annoyance reactions, environmental epidemiology
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-7535 (URN)91-7191-361-0 (ISBN)
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-01-10 Created: 2008-01-10 Last updated: 2012-11-09Bibliographically approved

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