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The Museum of National Antiquities in Sweden and its national agenda: an overview of the 1900-1970 period
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. (EuNaMus, European National Museums)
2012 (English)In: Great Narratives of the PastTraditions and Revisions in National Museum / [ed] Dominique Poulot, Felicity Bodenstein, José María Lanzarote Guiral, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, , 23 p.229-251 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

How has a national narration been established and reproduced at Sweden’s central museum for Prehistory and the Middle Ages, the Museum of National Antiquities (MNA, today named the National Historical Museum)? The chronological framework for answering this question here relates to the period from 1900 to 1970 with an emphasis on the 1920-50 period, the foundational time of the Swedish Welfare state. During these decades the MNA changed on many levels, including a new building and a new organizational structure, which entailed a change of exhibitions as well. At the same time the museum presents a remarkable continuity with regard to its objectives and agenda.

During most of the 20th century the link between statistically processed object types and ethnographic interpretations was and is a discursive construction. However, the situation between 1900 and 1950 was unique with regard to the MNA exhibitions and the ideological profile of archaeology. What flourished then was an archaeology that might be characterized as nationally romantic, culturally conservative and racial, and one might add that this changed only gradually in the wake of the Second World War. Still, and despite certain sympathizers of Nazi Germany amongst its practitioners, Swedish archaeology cannot be compared to that developed in the context of Nazi ideology. It did not advocate or actively support racial war, euthanasia or aggressive racial hygiene (Baudou 2002). Nevertheless, Swedish archaeology formed part of an international context, where cooperation and correspondence between researchers, not least German ones, were a natural part of the practice. This article provides a brief outline of the theme of national identity and archaeological representation in Sweden, mainly through an interpretation of the displays of the early 20th century in the MNA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012. , 23 p.229-251 p.
Series
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings, ISSN 1650-3686 (print), 1650-3740 (online) ; 78
Keyword [en]
national museums, nationalism, museology, heritage
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Museology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-61503OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-61503DiVA: diva2:570021
Conference
Great Narratives of the Past Traditions and Revisions in National Museums: Conference Proceedings from EuNaMus, European National Museums: Identity Politics, the Uses of the Past and the European Citizen, Paris 28 June – 1 July & 25–26 November 2011
Projects
EuNaMus, European National Museums
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 244305
Note

EuNaMus Report No 4.

Available from: 2012-11-16 Created: 2012-11-16 Last updated: 2013-05-17Bibliographically approved

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Great Narratives of the PastTraditions and Revisions in National MuseumThe Museum of National Antiquities in Sweden and its national agenda: an overview of the 1900-1970 period

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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Language
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