umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Repeatedly Heading a Soccer Ball Does Not Increase Serum Levels of S-100B, a Biochemical Marker of Brain Tissue Damage: an Experimental Study.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
2008 (English)In: Biomarker Insights, ISSN 1177-2719, E-ISSN 1177-2719, Vol. 3, 87-91 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to analyse whether the controlled heading of soccer balls elicits increased serum concentrations of a biochemical marker of brain tissue damage S-100B. METHODS: Nineteen male soccer players were randomly divided into two groups, A and B. Group A headed a soccer ball falling from 18 m five times, while group B served as controls (no heading). Blood samples were taken before and 0.5 h, 2 h and 4 h after the heading for analysis of S-100B. RESULTS: No statistically significant (p > 0.05) increases in serum concentrations of S-100B were encountered in group A at 0.5 h (0.109 +/-0.024 mug/L), 2 h (0.098 +/- 0.026 mug/L), and 4 h (0.113 +/- 0.035 mug/L) when the blood samples obtained before and after the heading were compared (0.157 +/- 0.134 mug/L). No statistically significant difference was found when the serum concentrations of S-100B were compared between groups A and B either before or after heading. CONCLUSIONS: Heading a soccer ball dropped from a height of 18 m five times was not found to cause an increase in serum concentrations of S-100B, indicating that the impact was not sufficient to cause biochemically discernible damage of brain tissue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 3, 87-91 p.
Keyword [en]
Acute Disease, Adult, Biological Markers/blood, Brain Injuries/blood/psychology, Female, Humans, Hydrocortisone/*blood, Male, Nerve Growth Factors/*blood, Phosphopyruvate Hydratase/*blood, Prospective Studies, Regression Analysis, S100 Proteins/*blood, Stress Disorders; Post-Traumatic/*diagnosis, Time Factors
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-64341PubMedID: 19578497OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-64341DiVA: diva2:600291
Available from: 2013-01-24 Created: 2013-01-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

PubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Stålnacke, Britt-MarieSojka, Peter
By organisation
Rehabilitation MedicineDepartment of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences
In the same journal
Biomarker Insights
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 57 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf