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Long-term effect on mother-infant behaviour of extra contact during the first hour post partum: III. Follw-up at one year
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. (Departments of Pediatrics and Child Psychiatry, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm)
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. (Departments of Pediatrics and Child Psychiatry, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm)
1984 (English)In: Scandinavian journal of social medicine, ISSN 1403-4948 Print; 1651-1905 Online, Vol. 12, no 2, 91-103 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present prospective study examined, one year after delivery, the possible effects of early extra contact during the first hour following delivery. An extra skin-to-skin contact and suckling contact was allowed 22 primiparous mothers and their infants (P+ group). One control group of 20 primiparous mothers and their infants were given routine care immediately after birth (P group). During observation of a physical examination of the infant, ‘extra contact mothers’ held and touched their infants more frequently and more often talked positively to their infants than did mothers given routine care. ‘Extra contact mothers’ had returned to their professional employment outside the home to a lesser extent than had routine care mothers. A greater proportion of ‘extra contact’ infants slept in a room of their own. In the P+ group, mothers who had returned to gainful employment were also able to have their babies sleep in a room of their own—no such correspondence was found in the P group. The Gesell Developmental Schedules revealed that, in four parts out of five, infants with extra contact immediately after birth, were ahead of those in the control group. On the other hand, the Vineland Social Maturity Scale and the Cesarec Marke Personality Scheme did not reveal any major differences between the two groups. Mothers with early extra skin-to-skin contact and suckling contact breast-fed their infants on an average for 2 1/2 months longer than did routine care mothers. No other differences in feeding habits were found. The influence of extra contact was more pronounced in boy–mother than in girl–mother pairs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Associations of Public Health in the Nordic Countries Regions , 1984. Vol. 12, no 2, 91-103 p.
Keyword [en]
Mother–infant behaviour, extra contact, neonatal period, follow up
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-66898DOI: 10.1177/140349488401200205OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-66898DiVA: diva2:609679
Available from: 2013-03-06 Created: 2013-03-06 Last updated: 2013-03-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The first hour of life: description of the early reciprocal interaction : mother-infant behaviour and development of their mutual relationship
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The first hour of life: description of the early reciprocal interaction : mother-infant behaviour and development of their mutual relationship
1990 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The immediate post partum period may be particularly important for the developing relationship between mother and infant. This report consists of two studies: the first study (paper I) gives descriptions of the interaction between infants and their parents during the first hour post partum and the second study (papers II-IV) in this report examines the effect of extra contact during the first hour following delivery.

In the first, descriptive study, the study group consisted of 12 families, who were videotaped immediately after the birth of their infant. The aims of this study were to examine the absolute first contact between the newborn and its parents and to test Mahler's theory (1975) of the normal autistic phase. The videotapes were analysed by independent observers, who have examined the activities of the infants, the mothers, and the fathers with special emphasis on interaction. The typical process of activity development is presented and commented on and one case study is described in detail as an example (in Swedish in Appendix IV of paper I). The newborn's own capacity of intentionality and interaction through movements and sounds gives the mother a feeling of being the person who is sought by the infant during the first post partum hour. As this typical process is one of activity and of non-verbal interaction, it seems more appropriate to call this period a turning point phase or a phase of reciprocal adjustment immediately after delivery rather than a normal autistic phase as it was termed by Mahler.

In the second, longitudinal, prospective study, an extra naked skin-to-skin contact and suckling contact, during 15-20 minutes during the first hour post partum, was given to 22 primiparous mothers and their infants (P+ group). A control group of 20 primiparous mothers and their infants received routine care immediately after delivery (P group). The aim of the study was to examine what possible influence extra contact, in contrast to routine care, might have on the behaviour of mother and infant and on the development of their mutual relationship, also taking the sex of the infant into account. Follow-up studies were made at 36 hours, 3 months, 1 year, and 3 years after the birth of each infant. In this thesis the results of the 1-year and 3-year follow-up studies are included, both presenting main effects between the experimental group and the control group and effects in relation to boys and girls. The results of this study are discussed to some extent in relation to Mahler's theory of symbiosis and individuation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 1990. 112 p.
Keyword
First hour post partum, mother-infant behaviour, early interaction between mother and infant, observations, development, follow-up, Mahler's theory of symbiosis and individuation
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-66901 (URN)91-7174-503-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
1990-10-05, Humanisthuset, hörsal E, Umeå universitet, Umeå, 09:15
Projects
digitalisering@umu
Available from: 2013-03-06 Created: 2013-03-06 Last updated: 2013-03-06Bibliographically approved

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