umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Three-gene identity coefficients demonstrate that clonal reproduction promotes inbreeding and spatial relatedness in yellow-cedar, Callitropsis nootkatensis
Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Laurentian Forestry Centre, 1055, rue du P.E.P.S., c.p. 10380 Succursale Sainte-Foy, Québec QC G1V 4C7 Canada.
Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.
Institut de Recherche en Biologie Végétale, Université de Montréal, 4101 Sherbrooke Est, Montréal QC H1X 2B2, Canada.
Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.
2008 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 62, no 10, 2570-2579 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Asexual reproduction has the potential to promote population structuring through matings between clones as well as through limited dispersal of related progeny. Here we present an application of three-gene identity coefficients that tests whether clonal reproduction promotes inbreeding and spatial relatedness within populations. With this method, the first two genes are sampled to estimate pairwise relatedness or inbreeding, whereas the third gene is sampled from either a clone or a sexually derived individual. If three-gene coefficients are significantly greater for clones than nonclones, then clonality contributes excessively to genetic structure. First, we describe an estimator of three-gene identity and briefly evaluate its properties. We then use this estimator to test the effect of clonality on the genetic structure within populations of yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) using a molecular marker survey. Five microsatellite loci were genotyped for 485 trees sampled from nine populations. Our three-gene analyses show that clonal ramets promote inbreeding and spatial structure in most populations. Among-population correlations between clonal extent and genetic structure generally support these trends, yet with less statistical significance. Clones appear to contribute to genetic structure through the limited dispersal of offspring from replicated ramets of the same clonal genet, whereas this structure is likely maintained by mating among these relatives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2008. Vol. 62, no 10, 2570-2579 p.
National Category
Forest Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-67094DOI: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00470.xPubMedID: 18647338OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-67094DiVA: diva2:610623
Available from: 2013-03-12 Created: 2013-03-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Thompson, Stacey Lee
In the same journal
Evolution
Forest Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 64 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf