umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Air pollution exposure in early pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes: a register-based cohort study
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
2013 (English)In: BMJ open, ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 2, e001955- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to study the possible associations between exposure to elevated levels of air pollution, ozone (O(3)) and vehicle exhaust (NO(x)), during early gestation, and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as pre-eclampsia, preterm birth and small for gestational age. DESIGN: Prospective register-based cohort study. SETTING: The Swedish Medical Birth Register includes data on all deliveries during 1998 to 2006 in Greater Stockholm, Sweden. The national Patient Register and the Prescribed Drug Register were used to collect information on maternal asthma. PARTICIPANTS: All singleton pregnancies, conceived at the earliest in August 1997 and at the latest in February 2006, were included, n=120 755. OUTCOME MEASURES: We studied preterm birth, small for gestational age and pre-eclampsia. RESULTS: 4.4% of pregnancies resulted in a preterm birth. The prevalence of pre-eclampsia was 2.7%. We observed an association between first trimester O(3) and preterm birth (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08) as well as an association with pre-eclampsia (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08), per 10 µg/m(3) increase in O(3). We observed no association between first trimester NO(x) and adverse pregnancy outcomes. No associations were observed between any of the air pollutants and small for gestational age. CONCLUSIONS: Increased levels of O(3) during the first trimester increased the risk of pre-eclampsia and preterm birth. Air pollutants did not exhibit any effects on fetal growth restriction. We estimated 1 in every 20 cases of pre-eclampsia to be associated with O(3) exposure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 3, no 2, e001955- p.
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-67672DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001955ISI: 000315087200013PubMedID: 23386578OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-67672DiVA: diva2:613283
Available from: 2013-03-28 Created: 2013-03-27 Last updated: 2013-03-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(213 kB)181 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 213 kBChecksum SHA-512
57dc95e083d6f4107ed457fb489f2a712effc80edda7919c67f11063f77f66a6894048d29e83d6047149d1929e3fc74755b7f5177e6b3dd03a9511886234943f
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Olsson, DavidMogren, IngridForsberg, Bertil
By organisation
Occupational and Environmental MedicineObstetrics and Gynaecology
Environmental Health and Occupational Health

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 181 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 125 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf