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Are ectomycorrhizal fungi alleviating or aggravating nitrogen limitation of tree growth in boreal forests?
Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Forest Ecol & Management, SE-90183 Umea, Sweden.
Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Forest Ecol & Management, SE-90183 Umeå, Sweden. (SLU, Umeå Plant Sci Ctr, Dept Forest Genet & Plant Physiol, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden)
Int Inst Appl Syst Anal, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria.
Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Forest Ecol & Management, SE-90183 Umeå, Sweden.
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2013 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 198, no 1, 214-221 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Symbioses between plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi are thought to enhance plant uptake of nutrients through a favourable exchange for photosynthates. Ectomycorrhizal fungi are considered to play this vital role for trees in nitrogen (N)-limited boreal forests. We followed symbiotic carbon (C)N exchange in a large-scale boreal pine forest experiment by tracing 13CO2 absorbed through tree photosynthesis and 15N injected into a soil layer in which ectomycorrhizal fungi dominate the microbial community. We detected little 15N in tree canopies, but high levels in soil microbes and in mycorrhizal root tips, illustrating effective soil N immobilization, especially in late summer, when tree belowground C allocation was high. Additions of N fertilizer to the soil before labelling shifted the incorporation of 15N from soil microbes and root tips to tree foliage. These results were tested in a model for CN exchange between trees and mycorrhizal fungi, suggesting that ectomycorrhizal fungi transfer small fractions of absorbed N to trees under N-limited conditions, but larger fractions if more N is available. We suggest that greater allocation of C from trees to ectomycorrhizal fungi increases N retention in soil mycelium, driving boreal forests towards more severe N limitation at low N supply.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 198, no 1, 214-221 p.
Keyword [en]
field experiment, 13C-15N pulse labelling, modelling, mycorrhiza, nitrogen immobilization, nitrogen limitation, Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris)
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-67787DOI: 10.1111/nph.12139ISI: 000315440400022OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-67787DiVA: diva2:614287
Available from: 2013-04-04 Created: 2013-04-03 Last updated: 2017-05-29Bibliographically approved

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