umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Metabolic factors associated with risk of renal cell carcinoma
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
Univ Ulm, Inst Epidemiol & Med Biometry, D-89069 Ulm, Germany.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
Lund Univ, Skåne Univ Hosp, Dept Surg, Malmö, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 2, e57475- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies have shown that obesity and hypertension are associated with increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but less is known about the association to other metabolic factors. In the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can) data on body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), blood pressure, and circulating levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were collected from 560,388 men and women in cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden. By use of Cox proportional hazard models, hazard ratios (HR) were calculated for separate and composite metabolic exposures. During a median follow-up of 10 years, 592 men and 263 women were diagnosed with RCC. Among men, we found an increased risk of RCC for BMI, highest vs. lowest quintile, (HR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.13-2.03), systolic blood pressure, (HR = 3.40, 95% CI 1.91-6.06), diastolic blood pressure, (HR = 3.33, 95% CI 1.85-5.99), glucose, (HR = 3.75, 95% CI 1.46-9.68), triglycerides, (HR = 1.79, 95% CI 1.00-3.21) and a composite score of these metabolic factors, (HR = 2.68, 95% CI 1.75-4.11). Among women we found an increased risk of RCC for BMI, highest vs. lowest quintile, (HR = 2.21, 95% CI 1.32-3.70) and the composite score, (HR = 2.29, 95% CI 1.12-4.68). High levels of the composite score were also associated with risk of death from RCC among both men and women. No multiplicative statistical or biological interactions between metabolic factors on risk of RCC were found. High levels of BMI, blood pressure, glucose and triglycerides among men and high BMI among women were associated with increased risk of RCC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 8, no 2, e57475- p.
National Category
Urology and Nephrology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-67967DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0057475ISI: 000315524900094OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-67967DiVA: diva2:615683
Note

Finansiär: Lion’s Cancer Research Foundation, Umeå University, Sweden (LP 09-1799)

Available from: 2013-04-11 Created: 2013-04-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Metabolic factors and risk of prostate, kidney, and bladder cancer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metabolic factors and risk of prostate, kidney, and bladder cancer
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Sweden with around 10,000 new cases every year. Kidney and bladder cancer are less common with 1,000 and 2,000 new cases annually, respectively. The incidence of these cancer sites is higher in developed, than in developing countries, suggesting an association between lifestyle and cancer risk. The aims of this thesis were to investigate body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, total cholesterol, and triglycerides as risk factors for prostate, kidney, and bladder cancer. Furthermore, we aimed at assess probabilities of prostate cancer and competing events, all-cause death, for men with normal and high levels of metabolic factors.

Material and methods: This thesis was conducted within the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can), a pooled cohort study with data from 578,700 participants from Norway, Sweden, and Austria. Data from metabolic factors were prospectively collected at health examinations and linked to the Cancer and Cause of Death registers in each country. 

Results: High levels of metabolic factors were not associated with increased risk of prostate cancer, but high levels of BMI and blood pressure were associated with risk of prostate cancer death. The probability of prostate cancer was higher for men with normal levels of metabolic factors compared to men with high levels, but the probability of all-cause death, was higher for men with high levels than for those with normal levels. For both men and women, high levels of metabolic factors were associated with increased risk of kidney cancer (renal cell carcinoma). Furthermore, blood pressure for men and BMI for women were found as independent risk factors of kidney cancer. High blood pressure was associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer for men.

Conclusions: High levels of metabolic factors were associated to risk of kidney and bladder cancer and to death from kidney, bladder, and prostate cancer. Compared to men with normal levels, men with high levels of metabolic factors had a decreased probability of prostate cancer but an increased probability of all-cause death.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå Universitet, 2013. 58 p.
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 1612
Keyword
cohort study, competing risk, epidemiology, metabolic factors, prostate cancer, kidney cancer, bladder cancer, renal cell carcinoma, survival analysis
National Category
Urology and Nephrology
Research subject
Epidemiology; Urology; Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-83947 (URN)978-91-7459-763-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-01-24, Hörsal E04, byggnad 6E, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
Me-Can
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, 2010/628
Note

Ytterligare forskningsfinansiärer: World Cancer Research Fund (2007/09) och Wereld Kanker Onderzoek Fonds (R2010/247)

Available from: 2013-12-17 Created: 2013-12-11 Last updated: 2014-01-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(425 kB)149 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 425 kBChecksum SHA-512
910247a185036700314306646c8dbbdfbfb5230a3614b266c8a4011c9bab44114b9be67ed62ab804378abd281ba9f85b2bdc4f54684b44eb67fda02e0ff44567
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Häggström, ChristelStocks, TanjaLjungberg, BörjeHallmans, GöranJonsson, HåkanStattin, Pär

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Häggström, ChristelStocks, TanjaLjungberg, BörjeHallmans, GöranJonsson, HåkanStattin, Pär
By organisation
Urology and AndrologyNutritional ResearchDepartment of Biobank ResearchOncology
In the same journal
PLoS ONE
Urology and Nephrology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 149 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 174 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf