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Life course socioeconomic position and mortality: A population register-based study from Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Ageing and Living Conditions (ALC).
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). (Arcum)
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). (Arcum)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2475-7131
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 41, no 8, 785-791 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Adverse social circumstances during one’s life course have been related to an increased risk of mortality. This article extends the literature by focusing on adversity at each phase of, and cumulatively at midlife in the Swedish population.

Methods: Data on socioeconomic indicators from 1970, 1980 and 1990 were linked to death registrations from 2000 to 2009. Relative indices of inequalities were computed for socioeconomic indicators, in order to measure the cumulative impact of inequality on mortality.

Results: A significant cumulative effect of being in the worst-off socioeconomic groups was found. For men, almost all indicators had a significant independent impact on risk of death. Among women, significant independent impacts were found for education in 1990 and for socioeconomic index in the two census years of 1970 and 1980.

Conclusions: Being disadvantaged during longer period in midlife has a significant negative impact on health. Policies targeted to reduce health inequality should focus on every stage of the midlife course.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 41, no 8, 785-791 p.
Keyword [en]
life course, social inequality, health, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-71129DOI: 10.1177/1403494813493366ISI: 000330514500003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-71129DiVA: diva2:622027
Available from: 2013-05-20 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Padyab, MojganMalmberg, GunnarNorberg, MargaretaBlomstedt, Yulia
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Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • text
  • asciidoc
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