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Environmental Warming and Biodiversity-Ecosystem Functioning in Freshwater Microcosms: Partitioning the Effects of Species Identity, Richness and Metabolism
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
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2010 (English)In: Integrative Ecology: From Molecules to Ecosystems / [ed] Guy Woodward, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London, Academic Press, 2010, 177-209 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Predicting the effects of global warming on biodiversity–ecosystem functioning (B–EF) relationships is complicated by potential interactions among abiotic and biotic variables at multiple levels of organisation, including adaptation within regional species populations and changes in community composition and species richness. We investigated the capacity for assemblages of three freshwater invertebrate consumer species (Asellus aquaticusNemoura cinerea and Sericostoma personatum) from temperate (southern England) and boreal (northern Sweden) regions to respond to expected shifts in temperature and basal resources, and quantified rates of a key ecosystem process (leaf-litter decomposition). Predictions of assemblage metabolism, derived from allometric-body size and temperature scaling relationships, accounted for approximately 40% of the variance in decomposition rates. Assemblage species composition accounted for further variance, but species richness per se had no discernible effect. Regional differences were evident in rates of leaf decomposition across temperature and resource manipulations, and in terms of the processing efficiency of temperate and boreal consumers of the same species (i.e. after correcting for body size and metabolic capacity), suggesting that intraspecific variation among local populations could modulate B–EF effects. These differences have implications for extrapolating how environmental warming and other aspects of climate change (e.g. species range shifts) might affect important drivers of ecosystem functioning over large biogeographical scales.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2010. 177-209 p.
Series
Advances in Ecological Research, ISSN 0065-2504 ; 43
Keyword [en]
Allometric scaling, Body size, Climate change, Decomposition, Global warming, Metabolic capacity, Species identity, Thermal optima
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-75750DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-385005-8.00005-8ISI: 000286800200006ISBN: 978-0-12-385005-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-75750DiVA: diva2:635354
Available from: 2013-07-03 Created: 2013-07-03 Last updated: 2017-01-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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