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Matrix metalloproteinase-9 deficiency phenocopies features of preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction
Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143.
Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143.
Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143.
Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143.
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2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 110, no 27, 11109-11114 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The pregnancy complication preeclampsia (PE), which occurs in approximately 3% to 8% of human pregnancies, is characterized by placental pathologies that can lead to significant fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Currently, the only known cure is delivery of the placenta. As the etiology of PE remains unknown, it is vital to find models to study this common syndrome. Here we show that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) deficiency causes physiological and placental abnormalities in mice, which mimic features of PE. As with the severe cases of this syndrome, which commence early in gestation, MMP9-null mouse embryos exhibit deficiencies in trophoblast differentiation and invasion shortly after implantation, along with intrauterine growth restriction or embryonic death. Reciprocal embryo transfer experiments demonstrated that embryonic MMP9 is a major contributor to normal implantation, but maternal MMP9 also plays a role in embryonic trophoblast development. Pregnant MMP9-null mice bearing null embryos exhibited clinical features of PE as VEGF dysregulation and proteinuria accompanied by preexisting elevated blood pressure and kidney pathology. Thus, our data show that fetal and maternal MMP9 play a role in the development of PE and establish the MMP9-null mice as a much-needed model to study the clinical course of this syndrome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Academy of Sciences , 2013. Vol. 110, no 27, 11109-11114 p.
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-76678DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1309561110PubMedID: 23776237OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-76678DiVA: diva2:636812
Available from: 2013-07-12 Created: 2013-07-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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