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Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
Department of Hematology, National University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark..
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Leukocyte Biology, ISSN 0741-5400, E-ISSN 1938-3673, Vol. 94, no 2, 223-236 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On the contrary, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans and mouse strains, which facilitates a more accurate interpretation of in vivo results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 94, no 2, 223-236 p.
Keyword [en]
killing, immune evasion, myeloperoxidase, defensins
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80700DOI: 10.1189/jlb.0213063PubMedID: 23650619OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-80700DiVA: diva2:651098
Available from: 2013-09-24 Created: 2013-09-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Niemiec, Maria JoannaUrban, Constantin F

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