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Dietary intake of naturally occurring plant sterols is related to a lower risk of a first myocardial infarction in men but not in women in northern sweden
Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 143, no 10, 1630-1635 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dietary intake of naturally occurring plant sterols is inversely related to serum cholesterol concentrations. Elevated serum cholesterol increases the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), but it is unknown if this can be reduced by dietary intake of naturally occurring plant sterols. Our aim was to investigate if a high intake of naturally occurring plant sterols is related to a lower risk of contracting a first MI. The analysis included 1005 prospective cases (219 women, 786 men) and 3148 matched referents (723 women, 2425 men), aged 29-73 y at baseline, from the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. A food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was completed at baseline. Absolute plant sterol intake was inversely related to the risk of a first MI in men (OR highest vs. lowest quartile = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.53, 0.85; P-trend = 0.006) but not in women. After adjustment for confounders, the estimated risk was somewhat attenuated (OR highest vs. lowest quartile = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55, 0.92; P-trend = 0.067), suggesting that increasing sterol intake from 150 to 340 mg/d reduces the risk of a first MI by 29%. Energy-adjusted plant sterol intake was not related to the risk of a first MI in either men or women. In conclusion, the findings of this observational study show that a high absolute intake of naturally occurring plant sterols is significantly related to a lower risk of a first MI in men in northern Sweden, whereas no significant relation was seen for energy-adjusted plant sterol intake. In women, no significant associations were found. The results from this study show that intake of plant sterols may be important in prevention of MI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 143, no 10, 1630-1635 p.
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Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nutrition and Dietetics
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80871DOI: 10.3945/jn.113.178707ISI: 000330331700014PubMedID: 23925940OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-80871DiVA: diva2:651759
Available from: 2013-09-27 Created: 2013-09-27 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, IngegerdJansson, Jan-HåkanHallmans, Göran

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Johansson, IngegerdJansson, Jan-HåkanHallmans, Göran
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