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A 3D in vitro model reveals differences in the astrocyte response elicited by potential stem cell therapies for CNS injury
Department of Life Health & Chemical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK.
Department of Life Health & Chemical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK.
Department of Life Health & Chemical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK.
Department of Life Health & Chemical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK.
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2013 (English)In: Regenerative Medicine, ISSN 1746-0751, E-ISSN 1746-076X, Vol. 8, no 6, 739-746 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: This study aimed to develop a 3D culture model to test the extent to which transplanted stem cells modulate astrocyte reactivity, where exacerbated glial cell activation could be detrimental to CNS repair success.

MATERIALS & METHODS: The reactivity of rat astrocytes to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) and differentiated adipose-derived stem cells was assessed after 5 days. Schwann cells were used as a positive control.

RESULTS: NCSCs and differentiated Schwann cell-like adipose-derived stem cells did not increase astrocyte reactivity. Highly reactive responses to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Schwann cells were equivalent.

CONCLUSION: This approach can screen therapeutic cells prior to in vivo testing, allowing cells likely to trigger a substantial astrocyte response to be identified at an early stage. NCSCs and differentiated Schwann cell-like adipose-derived stem cells may be useful in treating CNS damage without increasing astrogliosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Future Medicine Ltd. , 2013. Vol. 8, no 6, 739-746 p.
Keyword [en]
3D cell culture, astrocytes, CNS, reactive gliosis, spinal cord, stem cell therapy
National Category
Neurosciences Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-83709DOI: 10.2217/rme.13.61PubMedID: 24147529OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-83709DiVA: diva2:675973
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilWellcome trust, 080309
Available from: 2013-12-05 Created: 2013-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Kingham, Paul J

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