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Implicit beliefs of ability, approach-avoidance goals and cognitive anxiety among team sport athletes
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Canberra, Faculty of Health.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2014 (English)In: European Journal of Sport Science, ISSN 1746-1391, E-ISSN 1536-7290, Vol. 14, no 7, 720-729 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People’s implicit beliefs of ability have been suggested as an antecedent of achievement goal adoption, which has in turn been associated with behavioural, cognitive and affective outcomes. This study examined a conditional process model with team sport athletes’ approach-avoidance achievement goals as mediators between their implicit beliefs of sport ability and sport-related cognitive anxiety. We expected gender to moderate the paths from implicit beliefs of ability to approach-avoidance goals and from approach-avoidance goals to cognitive anxiety. Team sport athletes with a mean age of 20 years (163 females and 152 males) responded to questionnaires about their implicit beliefs of sport ability, approach-avoidance goals and sport-related cognitive anxiety. Incremental beliefs, gender and the interaction between them predicted mastery approach goals. Gender also predicted mastery-avoidance goals, with females reporting higher levels than males. Mastery- avoidance goals, gender and the interaction between them predicted cognitive anxiety, with females reporting higher levels of anxiety than males. Entity beliefs positively predicted performance-avoidance goals and the interaction between performance-approach and gender predicted anxiety. The indirect effects also showed gender differences in relation to performance-approach goals. Taken together, our results suggest that coaches trying to create a facilitating climate for their male and female athletes may be wise to consider their athletes’ anxiety and achievement goal patterns as these may affect both the athletes’ well-being and performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2014. Vol. 14, no 7, 720-729 p.
Keyword [en]
motivation, gender differences, anxiety, team sports, conditional process model
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87621DOI: 10.1080/17461391.2014.901419ISI: 000342285700011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-87621DiVA: diva2:710283
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2011-0177
Available from: 2014-04-06 Created: 2014-04-06 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Stenling, AndreasHassmén, PeterHolmström, Stefan

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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