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Dietary Protein Intake and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in Europe: The EPIC-InterAct Case-Cohort Study
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2014 (English)In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 37, no 7, 1854-1862 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The long-term association between dietary protein and type 2 diabetes incidence is uncertain. We aimed to investigate the association between total, animal, and plant protein intake and the incidence of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The prospective European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study consists of 12,403 incident type 2 diabetes cases and a stratified subcohort of 16,154 individuals from eight European countries, with an average follow-up time of 12.0 years. Pooled country-specific hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CI of prentice-weighted Cox regression analyses were used to estimate type 2 diabetes incidence according to protein intake. RESULTS: After adjustment for important diabetes risk factors and dietary factors, the incidence of type 2 diabetes was higher in those with high intake of total protein (per 10 g: HR 1.06 [95% CI 1.02-1.09], P-trend < 0.001) and animal protein (per 10 g: 1.05 [1.02-1.08], P-trend = 0.001). Effect modification by sex (P < 0.001) and BMI among women (P < 0.001) was observed. Compared with the overall analyses, associations were stronger in women, more specifically obese women with a BMI > 30 kg/m(2) (per 10 g animal protein: 1.19 [1.09-1.32]), and nonsignificant in men. Plant protein intake was not associated with type 2 diabetes (per 10 g: 1.04 [0.93-1.16], P-trend = 0.098). CONCLUSIONS: High total and animal protein intake was associated with a modest elevated risk of type 2 diabetes in a large cohort of European adults. In view of the rapidly increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes, limiting iso-energetic diets high in dietary proteins, particularly from animal sources, should be considered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 37, no 7, 1854-1862 p.
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91187DOI: 10.2337/dc13-2627ISI: 000338020400018OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-91187DiVA: diva2:735161
Note

Errata Diabetes Care 2015 Oct; 38(10): 1992-1992. DOI: 10.2337/dc15-er10b

Available from: 2014-07-23 Created: 2014-07-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Rolandsson, Olov

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