umu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Demographic responses to colonization among indigenous populations: Migration and mortality in 19th-century northernmost Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts. (Centrum för befolkningsstudier ; Arcum)
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). (Age and living conditions)
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
2013 (English)In: XXVII IUSSP International Population Conference: Book of abstracts, 2013, 221-221 p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Although history shows how colonization has exposed indigenous populations to vulnerability, there is a narrow quantitative knowledge of how they demographically responded to colonization. Swedish parish registers are unique in providing longitudinal demographic data on the indigenous populations in northernmost Sweden: the Sami. The Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, has digitized these registers, which allows this study to conduct event history analyses of the Sami’s colonial experiences during the 19th century. If colonization added to the Sami’s difficulties to maintain their traditional use of land and lifestyle, it would be indicated by (1) untimely death among them; (2) a desire to leave their space as it was increasingly colonized. However, the propensity to depart was significantly higher among the Non-Sami people, primarily settlers, probably because it was a tough task to establish a farm in these remote cold areas. Additionally, ‘lock-in’ mechanisms might have reduced the Sami’s inclination to relocate, if this meant giving up a lifestyle and occupation difficult to perform in other settings. Their survival chances were higher than those of the Non-Sami, especially among women. In all, the findings propose that the Non-Sami individuals suffered from an ‘unhealthy migrant effect’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. 221-221 p.
Series
International Union for the Scientific Study of Populations (IUSSP), 27
National Category
Humanities Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
History; Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92050OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-92050DiVA: diva2:739346
Conference
XXVII IUSSP International Population Conference, August 26-31, 2013, Korea
Available from: 2014-08-20 Created: 2014-08-20 Last updated: 2016-05-25

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Authority records BETA

Vikström, LottaMarklund, Emil

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Vikström, LottaMarklund, Emil
By organisation
Faculty of ArtsCentre for Population Studies (CPS)Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies
HumanitiesMedical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 144 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf