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Red-listed wood-inhabiting fungi in natural and managed forest landscapes adjacent to the timberline in central Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 29, no 5, 455-465 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many wood-inhabiting fungi are today threatened as modern forestry practices drastically reduce the amount of dead wood available in various forest ecosystems. We investigated whether the occurrence of red-listed wood-inhabiting fungi differed between natural and managed forest landscapes adjacent to the timberline in the middle part of Sweden. We assessed whether environmental variables such as the degree of human impact, length of forest roads, dead wood volume and quality affected species richness and abundance. The effects of forestry on wood-inhabiting fungi have been assessed in several studies in lowland Swedish forests. Few studies have, however, been conducted in forest landscapes adjacent to the timberline in Sweden. This is potentially important since forests close to the Swedish mountains have been pointed out as one of few intact forest landscapes in Fennoscandia and they are subjected to increasing logging pressure. Similar to other studies, species numbers and abundances were positively correlated with larger volumes of logs in various decay stages. However, never shown previously, the length of forest roads was negatively correlated with species abundance and occurrence of red-listed species. We suggest that a low amount of forest roads can be used as a conservation indicator to localize still-intact forest landscapes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2014. Vol. 29, no 5, 455-465 p.
Keyword [en]
forest conservation, indicator species, boreal forest landscapes, coarse woody debris, human impact, road-free areas
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92966DOI: 10.1080/02827581.2014.919353ISI: 000339921400005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-92966DiVA: diva2:746347
Available from: 2014-09-12 Created: 2014-09-09 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Magnusson, MagnusOlsson, JörgenHedenås, Henrik
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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
  • ieee
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  • de-DE
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