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Does second-home ownership trigger migration in later life?
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2014-7179
2016 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 22, no 3, 228-240 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As a result of the ongoing urbanization trend in many countries, most rural and peripheral areas are suffering from depopulation and out-migration. Nevertheless, some rural areas are experiencing a net in-flow of older migrants. One explanation mentioned is that people own second homes that are converted into permanent homes in later life. However, this description has rarely been tested empirically. Rather, it has been described as residual for migration into rural areas. Three hypotheses have been put forward in relation to second homes as a trigger for migration in later life. The first is that second-home owners are less inclined to move but utilize their second home more as a substitute for permanent amenity migration. The second is that owners are more likely to move as they have the opportunity to move permanently to their second home, while the third is that second-home owners would be more likely to downsize from their permanent home and make housing adjustments. This study attempts to answer the question if second-home ownership triggers migration in later life and if it is a matter of housing adjustment or converting a second home into a permanent home. This is performed by analysing microdata covering all individuals in Sweden in the 55–70-years age range in the 1999–2008 period. Results support the hypothesis that second-home ownership triggers migration in later life and, by so doing, imply that a life course perspective is valuable for our understanding of migration in later life and that not only permanent migration but also experiences of temporary mobility are relevant for migration biographies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 22, no 3, 228-240 p.
Keyword [en]
retirement migration, second homes, rural population development, life course
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95098DOI: 10.1002/psp.1880ISI: 000373801600002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-95098DiVA: diva2:757392
Note

Article first published online: 22 OCT 2014

Available from: 2014-10-22 Created: 2014-10-22 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Marjavaara, RogerLundholm, Emma

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CiteExportLink to record
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