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Gene-Lifestyle Interactions in Complex Diseases: Design and Description of the GLACIER and VIKING Studies
Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
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2014 (Engelska)Ingår i: Current nutrition reports, ISSN 2161-3311, Vol. 3, nr 4, s. 400-411Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

Most complex diseases have well-established genetic and non-genetic risk factors. In some instances, these risk factors are likely to interact, whereby their joint effects convey a level of risk that is either significantly more or less than the sum of these risks. Characterizing these gene-environment interactions may help elucidate the biology of complex diseases, as well as to guide strategies for their targeted prevention. In most cases, the detection of gene-environment interactions will require sample sizes in excess of those needed to detect the marginal effects of the genetic and environmental risk factors. Although many consortia have been formed, comprising multiple diverse cohorts to detect gene-environment interactions, few robust examples of such interactions have been discovered. This may be because combining data across studies, usually through meta-analysis of summary data from the contributing cohorts, is often a statistically inefficient approach for the detection of gene-environment interactions. Ideally, single, very large and well-genotyped prospective cohorts, with validated measures of environmental risk factor and disease outcomes should be used to study interactions. The presence of strong founder effects within those cohorts might further strengthen the capacity to detect novel genetic effects and gene-environment interactions. Access to accurate genealogical data would also aid in studying the diploid nature of the human genome, such as genomic imprinting (parent-of-origin effects). Here we describe two studies from northern Sweden (the GLACIER and VIKING studies) that fulfill these characteristics.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
2014. Vol. 3, nr 4, s. 400-411
Nationell ämneskategori
Medicinsk genetik
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96711DOI: 10.1007/s13668-014-0100-8PubMedID: 25396097OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-96711DiVA, id: diva2:766471
Tillgänglig från: 2014-11-27 Skapad: 2014-11-27 Senast uppdaterad: 2018-06-07Bibliografiskt granskad

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Ågren, ÅsaEngberg, ElisabethJohansson, IngegerdBrändström, AndersHallmans, GöranRenström, FridaFranks, Paul W

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Ågren, ÅsaEngberg, ElisabethJohansson, IngegerdBrändström, AndersHallmans, GöranRenström, FridaFranks, Paul W
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Enheten för biobanksforskningDemografiska databasenInstitutionen för odontologiNäringsforskningMedicin
Medicinsk genetik

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