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Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aggressive multiple sclerosis: the Swedish experience
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 85, no 10, 1116-1121 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a viable option for treatment of aggressive multiple sclerosis (MS). No randomised controlled trial has been performed, and thus, experiences from systematic and sustained follow-up of treated patients constitute important information about safety and efficacy. In this observational study, we describe the characteristics and outcome of the Swedish patients treated with HSCT for MS. METHODS: Neurologists from the major hospitals in Sweden filled out a follow-up form with prospectively collected data. Fifty-two patients were identified in total; 48 were included in the study and evaluated for safety and side effects; 41 patients had at least 1 year of follow-up and were further analysed for clinical and radiological outcome. In this cohort, 34 patients (83%) had relapsing-remitting MS, and mean follow-up time was 47 months. RESULTS: At 5 years, relapse-free survival was 87%; MRI event-free survival 85%; expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score progression-free survival 77%; and disease-free survival (no relapses, no new MRI lesions and no EDSS progression) 68%. Presence of gadolinium-enhancing lesions prior to HSCT was associated with a favourable outcome (disease-free survival 79% vs 46%, p=0.028). There was no mortality. The most common long-term side effects were herpes zoster reactivation (15%) and thyroid disease (8.4%). CONCLUSIONS: HSCT is a very effective treatment of inflammatory active MS and can be performed with a high degree of safety at experienced centres.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 85, no 10, 1116-1121 p.
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Neurology Psychiatry Surgery
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97239DOI: 10.1136/jnnp-2013-307207ISI: 000344456000228OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-97239DiVA: diva2:772292
Available from: 2014-12-16 Created: 2014-12-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Svenningsson, AndersIsaksson, Cecilia
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Clinical NeuroscienceDepartment of Radiation Sciences
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CiteExportLink to record
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