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Translocal Frame Extensions in a Networked Protest: Situating the #IdleNoMore hashtag
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
2014 (English)In: IC: Revista Científica de Información y Comunicación, ISSN 1696-2508, E-ISSN 2173-1071, Vol. 11, 49-77 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to examine how locally situated social movements can use social media to deploy translocally networked forms of protests. The study looks at the Canadian Idle No More movement, an indigenous and environmental grassroots initiative that emerged around the end of 2012 and the beginning of 2013 as a reaction to previous neglect of indigenous groups and to the omnibus bill proposal C-45 (which threatened both the partial sovereignty of indigenous territories and the Canadian environment). Focusing on the -decentralized and heterogeneous- movement’s Twitter use in general, and the employment of the hashtag #idlenomore in particular, the study examines to which extent and how Twitter may be a means for establishing bonds between geographically dispersed social movements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 11, 49-77 p.
Keyword [en]
Idle No More, Twitter, issue publics, frame analysis, social movements, translocality, framing theory, hashtag
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100665OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-100665DiVA: diva2:793021
Available from: 2015-03-05 Created: 2015-03-05 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Digital media and the transnationalization of protests
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital media and the transnationalization of protests
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Recent developments in communications technology have transformed how social movements might mobilize, and how they can organize their activities. This thesis explores some of the geographical consequences of the use of digital media for political activism. It does this by focusing on the transnationalization of protests. The aim is to analyse how movements with different organizational structures and political scopes are affected by their use of digital media. This is done with a specific focus on how digital media use influences or enables transnational modes of organization and activism. The thesis comprises four different case studies where each study examines a social movement with a specific organizational structure. There are, however, also important similarities between the movements. In each study, somewhat different perspectives and methodological approaches are used. Some of the methods used are semi-structured interviews, content analysis of written data (retrieved from Facebook as well as Twitter), and social network analysis.

The analysis indicates that digital media do have a role in the transnationalization of protest. This role, however, differs depending on what type of social movement one studies. The organizational structure of social movements, together with their specific forms of digital media use, influences how the transnationalization of protests and movements is articulated and formed. In cases where a social movement has a hierarchical organizational structure, there is less transnationalization, whereas in social movements with a more non-hierarchical organizational structure one sees more transnationalization. The thesis concludes that the transnationalization of protests is affected by social movements’ organizational structure. The more decentralized the social movement, the more vibrant the transnational public. In order to explain how transnational social movements, using digital media, can emerge in cases where geographical distances might make such coalitions unlikely, the thesis introduces the notion of affectual proximity. This concept helps us understand how transnational social movements, connecting actors from all over the world, can emerge through digital media. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2016. 57 p.
Series
Akademiska avhandlingar vid Sociologiska institutionen, Umeå universitet, ISSN 1104-2508 ; 77
Keyword
Social movements, social media, digital media, digital activism, transnational activism, affectual proximity
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114456 (URN)978-91-7601-405-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-02-12, Hörsal E, Humanisthuset, Umeå universitet, Umeå, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2016-01-22Bibliographically approved

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